Publications

Our publications gallery features published books by Simpson Center-affiliated scholars who received Simpson Center support for the research and writing of their work. If you have a Simpson Center-supported, published book that you would like to include in our gallery, please email the Communications Manager at cgrimmer@uw.edu.
Translation’s Forgotten History: Russian Literature, Japanese Mediation, and the Formation of Modern Korean Literature
Heekyoung Cho
Translation’s Forgotten History: Russian Literature, Japanese Mediation, and the Formation of Modern Korean Literature
Translation’s Forgotten History: Russian Literature, Japanese Mediation, and the Formation of Modern Korean Literature
Heekyoung Cho
Translation’s Forgotten History investigates the meanings and functions that translation generated for modern national literatures during their formative period and reconsiders literature as part of a dynamic translational process of negotiating foreign values. By examining the triadic literary and cultural relations among Russia, Japan, and colonial Korea and revealing a shared sensibility and literary experience in East Asia (which referred to Russia as a significant other in the formation of...
Statistical Panic: Cultural Politics and Poetics of the Emotions
Kathleen Woodward
Statistical Panic: Cultural Politics and Poetics of the Emotions
Statistical Panic: Cultural Politics and Poetics of the Emotions
Kathleen Woodward
In this moving and thoughtful book, Kathleen Woodward explores the politics and poetics of the emotions, focusing on American culture since the 1960s. She argues that we are constrained in terms of gender, race, and age by our culture’s scripts for “emotional” behavior and that the accelerating impoverishment of interiority is a symptom of our increasingly media-saturated culture. She also shows how we can be empowered by stories that express...
Worldly Affiliations: Artistic Practice, National Identity, and Modernism in India, 1930–1990
Sonal Khullar
Worldly Affiliations: Artistic Practice, National Identity, and Modernism in India, 1930–1990
Worldly Affiliations: Artistic Practice, National Identity, and Modernism in India, 1930–1990
Sonal Khullar
The purpose of art, the Paris-trained artist Amrita Sher-Gil wrote in 1936, is to "create the forms of the future” by “draw[ing] its inspiration from the present.” Through art, new worlds can be imagined into existence as artists cultivate forms of belonging and networks of association that oppose colonialist and nationalist norms. Drawing on Edward Said’s notion of “affiliation” as a critical and cultural imperative against empire and nation-state, Worldly...