Rethinking the Global Turn

Year of Funding: 
2018/2019
Cave painting of animals

In 2018-2019, the Division of Art History hosts a series of lectures and workshops, Rethinking the Global Turn: Oceanic, Geological, and Digital Art Histories, to address the needs of our doctoral and master’s students, organized in conjunction with the Katz Distinguished Lectureship of Whitney M. Davis (UC Berkeley) and a graduate seminar on “World Art Studies and Global Art Histories” offered by Sonal Khullar (Associate Professor, Art History) in winter 2019. Open to students in humanistic and humanistically oriented social scientific disciplines, this seminar provides a forum for critical inquiry and interdisciplinary dialogue on the visual arts, aesthetics, and art history.

Critics and scholars have identified the global turn as the most significant intellectual development in art history over the past decade. This turn has entailed the study of non-Western and postcolonial cultures in addition to Euro-American canons and centers that have been the focus of the discipline. It has generated new methods and approaches to analyze previously overlooked forms of connection and exchange. However, these narratives are often routed through and across nation-states and focus on conventional geographic areas (for example, Asia, Europe); anthropocentric frameworks; and modernist notions of space, time, and matter. Our invited speakers have established art historical paradigms that open up other possibilities: the oceanic, the geological, and the digital. They have engaged research in the humanities, sciences, and social sciences, creating new applications and audiences for art history in the twenty-first century.

  • January 24-25, 2019: Nancy Um (Professor and Department Chair, Art History, Binghamton University)
  • February 18-22, 2019: Whitney M. Davis (George C. and Helen N. Pardee Professor of History and Theory of Ancient and Modern Art, University of California, Berkeley)
  • April 25-26, 2019: Sarah V. Turner(Deputy Director of Research, Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art [Yale University], London, UK)

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