Society of Scholars

Activist poetics panel at a roundtable with microphones

The Society of Scholars is an intellectual community of humanists of diverse generations, academic ranks, and departmental affiliations who contribute to and learn from one another’s work. Each year, approximately eight faculty and three dissertation research fellowships support members of the Society of Scholars. Scholars in year-long residence at the University of Washington may be invited to participate as well. The group meets biweekly throughout the year to discuss their research in progress. 

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Cohort Archives

2021 - 2022 Society of Scholars

Mika Ahuvia in suit jacket smiling with bookcase in background
Associate Professor
Jackson School of International Studies
Portrait of José Alaniz in wintertime New York from 2018
Professor
Slavic Languages and Literatures
Portrait of Dan Berger leaning against a brick wall
Associate Professor
School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, UW Bothell
Profile picture of Sarah Brucia Breitenfeld: a person with short brown hair in a blue button up sitting in front of a lake.
Phd Candidate
Classics
Portrait of Stephanie Clare; woman wearing glasses, red shirt and black blazer
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Portrait of Hajin Jun
Assistant Professor
History
Portrait of Louisa Mackenzie
Associate Professor
French & Italian Studies
Portrait of Leigh Mercer
Associate Professor
Spanish & Portuguese Studies
Portrait of Xin Peng standing by a golden Japanese Maple tree
PhD Candidate
Cinema & Media Studies
Portrait of Rich Watts
Associate Professor
French & Italian Studies
Profile of Katia smiling at the camera in a dark blazer and orange shirt
Doctoral Student
History

2021 - 2022 Society of Scholars Fellow

Portrait of Hajin Jun

Hajin Jun (she/her/hers)

Assistant Professor

Protestantism and the Politics of Ritual Change in Colonial Korea

During the period of Japanese colonial rule (1910-1945), Korea was a crucible of ritual conflict and transformation. Efforts to reform weddings, funerals, and ancestral veneration—three Confucian rites of passage that long oriented people’s lives—began to sweep the peninsula, especially among fast-growing Protestant communities, Korean nationalist intellectuals, and colonial bureaucrats. My project examines changes in Korean ritual life to explore how and why religious difference emerged as a political problem under Japanese colonial rule.