Projects tagged with 'any keyword'

International Piers Plowman Society Conference

Piers Plowman Luttrell Psalter

The International Piers Plowman Society meets to foster critical study of the poem(s) Piers Plowman, a fourteenth-century alliterative narrative told in a series of dream visions.

The Cascadia Seminar: Ethnographic Adventures in Medical Anthropology

In conjunction with the 2015 Cascadia Seminar in Medical Anthropology, Mette Nordahl Svendsen will give a public lecture about her research project, "A Life Worth Living: Negotiating Life Worthiness in Human and Animal." Svendsen is Associate Professor in the Medical Science & Technology Studies program, in the School of Public Health at the University of Copenhagen (Denmark). For this project, funded by a prestigious Sapere Aude grant from the Danish Council for Independent Research, Svendsen directs a small team of researchers exploring--through ethnographic research in laboratories, care homes, and clinics--how the "life worthiness" is enacted, conceptualized, and contested in practice, for experimental research animals and the fragile humans (premature infants and dementia sufferers) for whom these animals serve as models.

ArtTalk—Conversations with Northwest Native Art

ArtTalk—Conversations with Northwest Native Art is organized by the Bill Holm Center for the Study of Northwest Coast Art and will bring together leading scholars and Native American/First Nations artists to present and discuss current trends and recent research on the distinctive art traditions of our region, both to examine the last fifty years of Northwest Coast art, as marked by the 50th anniversary volume of Bill Holm’s Northwest Coast Indian Art: An Analysis of Form, and to look forward to the next fifty years.

The Roles of Fiction in Early Modern Philosophy

One central trope of early modern philosophy and natural science was the rejection of fictions, like so-called "feigned hypotheses," and the focus on empirically observed phenomena. Yet, even as philosophers rejected the abstract notion of a fiction, they still relied upon fictions and narrative models in fundamental ways. Participants in this conference will examine this tension and look at both particular philosophers--such as Descartes, Spinoza, Hobbes, Hume, and Kant--and general themes, including the conception of fiction itself, the use of fiction in producing metaphysical knowledge, the use of fictions as examples in moral theory, and scientific models as kinds of fictions. We also intend to consider how philosophy was used in fiction, both in the period itself and then later, as in the case of the novelist George Eliot.

Scale and Value: New and Digital Approaches to Literary History

This conference and the ensuing publication in Modern Language Quarterly will present work by leading scholars whose use of digital texts or quantitative methods is clarifying the relationship between literary scale and value and yielding new insights into the literary history of the last three centuries.

Medieval Studies

The Medieval Studies Graduate Interest Group (MSGIG) aims to bring together medieval scholars from a wide variety of departments on campus to foster collaboration between disciplines on topics concerning the middle ages.

Public/School: An Editorial Collective

This Graduate Student Interest Group serves as a laboratory to workshop solutions for the issues of translation across disciplines and between audiences, as well to identify sites of collaboration along shared social problems. We ground this theory in the practice of editing and distributing a print journal and companion website for the broader community.

Reading and Writing Affect

Reading and Writing Affect is a monthly reading group and writing workshop that offers a thorough overview of the current field of affect theory and related discourses such as trauma studies and phenomenology.

Teaching with Technology

Teaching with Technology aims to bring together graduate teaching assistants from various departments to discuss and develop technology-based teaching tools and lessons. This group provides a platform for instructors with varying experience levels to collaborate on and workshop a pedagogical toolkit that brings technology such as mobile devices, screen-capture software, social media, and blogging into a variety of classroom settings.

Moving Images Research Group (MIRG)

The Moving Images Research Group (MIRG) brings together an interdisciplinary group of faculty and students focused on the study of moving images, including narrative and documentary film as well as television and new media. Our previously funded projects supported the new Cinema & Media Studies PhD Certificate Program and explored questions of physical and digital preservation. In 2014-15, we will facilitate the curricular breadth and depth of a new, free-standing Cinema & Media Studies (CMS) major by fostering crossdisciplinary academic research and pedagogical exchange as well as engaging the public around the past, present and future of moving images.

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provide UW faculty groups with leave to catalyze, deepen, or reconfigure cross-disciplinary research and to work toward publication.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

include speaker series, international research, and working conferences. They are selected for support based on their crossdisciplinary and interdisciplinary focus.

This series provides an opportunity for UW humanities scholars to discuss their recently published books.

seed new collaborations between faculty and graduate students who share research interests.

The Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities Series recognizes scholars in the humanities and emphasizes the role of the humanities in liberal education. The series is named after Solomon Katz, who served for 53 years at the UW, as an instructor, professor, Chair of the Department of History, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Provost, and Vice President for Academic Affairs. All Katz Lectures are free and open to the public. 

(formerly Graduate Interest Groups) encourage crossdisciplinary collaboration among graduate students through organized readings, screenings, dissertation working groups, and other activities.

are awarded for faculty, postdoctoral, and graduate research through both internal and external grants.  

are supported by small discretionary grants that facilitate opportunities for interdepartmental lectures, colloquia, and conferences at UW.

fund extended crossdisciplinary, collaborative projects that are often aligned with Simpson Center initiatives.

include the tri-annual Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities and the Joff Hanuaer Lectures in Western Civilization.

at the Simpson Center includes interdisciplinary graduate courses and the Certificate in Public Scholarship.

supports projects that promote collaboration between scholars and community partners in education, governmental, non-profit, and grassroots organizations.

stand at the leading edge of change by promoting collaborative, crossdisciplinary research and transformational scholarship.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy.

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Check here for a listing of scholarly blogs related to Simpson Center initiatives, programs, and projects.

Reading groups and microseminars with a number of UW faculty whose research interests dwell outside the usual purview of Asian American Studies.

In 2007, the Joff Hanauer Endowment for Excellence in Western Civilization was established through a gift from Seattle businessman and philanthropist Jerry Hanauer, in memory of his son. It supports two professorships and several graduate student fellowships in Western Civilization, in addition to a lecture series.

GIG

This initiative, launched in 2016, contributes to nationwide conversations about developing new approaches to doctoral education.

provide UW faculty groups with leave to catalyze, deepen, or reconfigure cross-disciplinary research and to work toward publication.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

include speaker series, international research, and working conferences. They are selected for support based on their crossdisciplinary and interdisciplinary focus.

This series provides an opportunity for UW humanities scholars to discuss their recently published books.

seed new collaborations between faculty and graduate students who share research interests.

The Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities Series recognizes scholars in the humanities and emphasizes the role of the humanities in liberal education. The series is named after Solomon Katz, who served for 53 years at the UW, as an instructor, professor, Chair of the Department of History, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Provost, and Vice President for Academic Affairs. All Katz Lectures are free and open to the public. 

(formerly Graduate Interest Groups) encourage crossdisciplinary collaboration among graduate students through organized readings, screenings, dissertation working groups, and other activities.

are awarded for faculty, postdoctoral, and graduate research through both internal and external grants.  

are supported by small discretionary grants that facilitate opportunities for interdepartmental lectures, colloquia, and conferences at UW.

fund extended crossdisciplinary, collaborative projects that are often aligned with Simpson Center initiatives.

include the tri-annual Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities and the Joff Hanuaer Lectures in Western Civilization.

at the Simpson Center includes interdisciplinary graduate courses and the Certificate in Public Scholarship.

supports projects that promote collaboration between scholars and community partners in education, governmental, non-profit, and grassroots organizations.

stand at the leading edge of change by promoting collaborative, crossdisciplinary research and transformational scholarship.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy.

art

Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy.

Check here for a listing of scholarly blogs related to Simpson Center initiatives, programs, and projects.

Reading groups and microseminars with a number of UW faculty whose research interests dwell outside the usual purview of Asian American Studies.

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war

law

In 2007, the Joff Hanauer Endowment for Excellence in Western Civilization was established through a gift from Seattle businessman and philanthropist Jerry Hanauer, in memory of his son. It supports two professorships and several graduate student fellowships in Western Civilization, in addition to a lecture series.

PhD

This initiative, launched in 2016, contributes to nationwide conversations about developing new approaches to doctoral education.

Vicente Rafael Publishes ‘Motherless Tongues: The Insurgency of Language amid Wars of Translation’

Longtime Simpson Center collaborator Vicente L. Rafael (History) examines the vexed relationship between language and history gleaned from the workings of translation in the Philippines, the United States, and beyond.

The Instagram Militia and the Limits of Empathy

Mosaic of people holding guns and closeups of guns

Tad Hirsch stitches together 80,000 assault-rifle selfies to examine America’s gun divide.

Faculty Workshop on Academic Book Proposals with Larin McLaughlin of UW Press

Submission/Application Deadline: 
Mon, 04/18/2016 - 12:00

Workshop is May 26.

Is the genre of the book proposal a complete mystery to you? UW Press Editor in Chief Larin McLaughlin will lead a workshop on the academic book proposal on May 26. The workshop will consist of a large-group discussion on model proposals and breakout discussions on proposals submitted by the participants. Proposals of ten to fifteen pages should include the following:

Simpson Center Welcomes New Staff

Erin Langner and Alison Fiorenza

The Simpson Center is delighted to announce two new staff members: Erin Langner, Program and Events Manager, and Alison Fiorenza, Administrative Coordinator.

Erin Langner

Program and Events Manager Erin Langner works with faculty and staff to plan cross-disciplinary symposia, lectures, colloquia, and special events.

Alison Fiorenza

FiorenzaAs Administrative Coordinator, Alison Fiorenza manages Simpson Center meeting spaces and provides support for technology issues. She is the first point of contact for reservations and Center inquiries, and she provides general clerical, fiscal, and operational support for Simpson Center staff.

Next Generation Humanities PhD

The Simpson Center invites proposals for a new initiative inspired by nationwide efforts to develop new approaches to doctoral education.

New Special Initiative: Next Generation Humanities PhD

Suzzallo library and Red Square at night

The Simpson Center invites proposals for a new initiative inspired by nationwide efforts to develop new approaches to doctoral education.

Mellon University Press Diversity Fellowship Program

Submission/Application Deadline: 
Tue, 03/15/2016 - 23:00

The University Press Diversity Fellowship Program seeks to increase diversity in scholarly publishing by providing year-long fellowships in the acquisitions departments of four university presses, including the University of Washington Press.

Lauren Berlant: On Humorlessness

Berlant and mask image

Affect theorist Lauren Berlant delivers a Katz Distinguished Lecture on March 2.

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2016 Digital Humanities Summer Fellows

Digital Humanities Summer Fellowships support scholars pursuing research projects that use digital technologies in innovative and intensive ways. Meet the 2016 Fellows.

2016-2017 Society of Scholars

The Society of Scholars is an intellectual community of humanists of diverse ranks and disciplines who contribute to and learn from one another's work. Meet the 2016-17 Scholars.

African Media and Materialities

A corner block with run-down cellphone repair shop called Dr. Musa Cellphone Repair, made from shipper containers

The African Media and Materialities graduate research cluster focuses on media and materialities to bring together several strands of thought and research.

Axiomatic: The Creative Process in Art and Mathematics

Abstract sculpture made from white porcelain and red plastic ties

Mathematics and art may appear to be diametrically opposite in both process and purpose: mathematics seeks truth while art seeks beauty. Yet mathematics, intellectually elegant and precise, is also beautiful.

Comparative Study of Race

Photo of a protest, two signs that read "From Ferguson to Palestine Occupation is a Crime" and "Ferguson and Palestine Stop Apartheid Now"

The Comparative Study of Race graduate research cluster connects students across the fields of Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies, Ethnic Studies, Queer Studies, African American Studies, American Indian Studies, Asian American Studies

Environmental Humanities

Photo of Mount Rainier; a field of grass and blue flowers with mountain tops in distance

What role can the humanities play in pursuing environmental safety and justice? How can they inform scientific inquiry?

Fall 2016

Fall 2016 HUM courses.

Humanistic Perspectives on Global Health Partnerships

Outside of Infectious Diseases Institute, logo with words "celebration of partnership" inside yellow and green circle

Over the past fifteen years, “partnership” has become a core value in the field of global health, signaling a rejection of older, more paternalistic modes of Western health interventions in Africa.

Mellon Fellows

Reimagining the Humanities PhD and Reaching New Publics, a four-year program funded by the Andrew W.

Mellon Fellows for Reaching New Publics in the Humanities

Students talk in classroom with graduate student

Mellon Fellows for Reaching New Publics in the Humanities are University of Washington gra

Mellon Summer Fellows for New Graduate Seminars in the Humanities

Mellon Summer Fellowships for New Graduate Seminars in the Humanities support the development of new courses by UW faculty in the humanities for do

Mellon Summer Fellows for Public Projects in the Humanities

Summer Fellowships for Public Projects in the Humanities support graduate student research projects that collaborate with or otherwise meaningfully

Migration and the Spaces of Sanctuary

A young man walking past graffiti-ed wall that reads "justice" and "no wall/border"

More than 60 million people were forced from their homes in 2015, according to United Nations estimates. This represents the worst year for forced movement since World War II.

Moving Images

Museum display of old cameras and film reels

The Moving Images graduate research cluster brings together students from a variety of departments focused on the study of moving images, including narrative and documentary film as well as television and new media.

Next Generation Humanities PhD - English

Blue background with "Manifesto for the Humanities: Transforming Doctoral Education in Good Enough Times" printed in white and gold ontop

This Next Generation Humanities PhD project brings together faculty and graduate students to rethink doctoral work in light of changes in higher education.

Palestine and the Public Sphere

Blue and white abstract painting

This research cluster brings together faculty and graduate students for critical and cross-disciplinary conversations and activities concerning the cultural, political, and economic situation of Palestine and its framing in US academic and public

Textual & Digital Studies Graduate Certificate

Corner of an old text page, with an over-laid image of a printed orange "B" seal

Textual studies encompasses a broad set of disciplinary practices and fields whose central concern is the production, circulation, and reception of texts in material form.

The Anthropocene

Art exhibit of a concrete pod that anchors a tree trunk and its roots with steel rods

This research cluster brings together faculty and graduate students to consider the provocations and implications of the Anthropocene thesis for the humanities.

Where the House Was

Black and white logo for project "Where the House was," with cranes replacing the "r" in "where" and the "h" in "the"

Where the House Was is a documentary film about literature, place, and community.

Writing Across Difference

Abstract painting of curly-ques in rainbow colors

This research cluster draws together scholars from the English Department writing programs, the Odegaard Writing & Research Center, Human Centered Design & Engineering, the Center for Teaching & Learning, and other programs to facilita

Writing Difference and Equity

The Writing Difference and Equity graduate research cluster supports graduate students across the humanities in developing productive and sustainable writing habits, in addressing the major barriers that PhD students face during the disse

David Shields

David Shields
Katz Distinguished Lecture in the Humanities
Tuesday, November 15, 2016 - 7:00pm
Kane Hall 210

David Shields is Professor of English at the University of Washington and the bestselling author of twenty books, including Reality Hunger and Black Planet.

Alondra Nelson

Alondra Nelson
Katz Distinguished Lecture in the Humanities
Wednesday, March 8, 2017 - 7:00pm
Kane Hall 120

Alondra Nelson is an interdisciplinary social scientist and Dean of Social Science and Professor of Sociology at Columbia University.

Lorraine Daston

Lorraine Daston
Lorraine Daston - Katz Distinguished Lecture in the Humanities
Wednesday, April 19, 2017 - 7:00pm
Kane Hall 210

Lorraine Daston is Director of the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin and Visiting Professor of Social Thought and History at the University of Chicago.