Programs tagged with 'any keyword'

Janelle Taylor

The Public Life of the Fetal Sonogram: Technology, Consumption and the Politics of Reproduction book cover
The Public Life of the Fetal Sonogram: Technology, Consumption and the Politics of Reproduction (Rutgers University Press, 2008)
Wednesday, December 3, 2008 - 4:00pm
Communications 202

In The Public Life of the Fetal Sonogram, Janelle Taylor (Anthropology) analyzes ultrasound technology and imagery in its

Shannon Dudley

Music From Behind the Bridge: Steelband and Spirit and Politics in Trinidad and Tobago
Tuesday, October 7, 2008 - 4:00pm
Communications 202

In his most recent book, Music From Behind the Bridge: Steelband Spirit and Politics in Trinidad and Tobago, Shannon Dudley examines the r

Mikkel Borch-Jacobsen

Making Minds and Madness: From Hysteria to Depression book cover
Making Minds and Madness: From Hysteria to Depression (Cambridge, 2009)
Wednesday, February 24, 2010 - 4:00pm
Communications 202

Why do “maladies of the soul” such as hysteria, anxiety disorders, or depression wax and wane over time?

Gillian Harkins

Everybody’s Family Romance: Reading Incest in Neoliberal America book cover
Everybody’s Family Romance: Reading Incest in Neoliberal America (University of Minnesota Press, 2009)
Thursday, March 11, 2010 - 4:00pm
Communications 202

More than just a portrait of their author, memoirs and autobiographical novels offer insight into the political, economic, and social climates of t

Zev Handel

Old Chinese Medials and their Sino-Tibetan Origins: A Comparative Study book cover
Old Chinese Medials and their Sino-Tibetan Origins: A Comparative Study (Institute of Linguistics, Academia Sinica, 2009)
Tuesday, May 4, 2010 - 4:00pm
Communications 202

Working to redefine our understanding of the pronunciation of Old Chinese, Zev Handel’s newest work, Old Chinese Medials and their Sino-Tibetan

Kathleen Blake

The Pleasures of Benthamism: Victorian Literature, Utility, Political Economy book cover
The Pleasures of Benthamism: Victorian Literature, Utility, Political Economy (Oxford University Press, 2009)
Wednesday, April 21, 2010 - 4:00pm
Communications 202

Often misunderstood, the study of utilitarianism and political economy in the context of Victorian literature has long been neglected in the field

Stephen Majeski

U.S. Foreign Policy in Perspective: Clients, Enemies, and Empire book cover
U.S. Foreign Policy in Perspective: Clients, Enemies, and Empire (Routledge, 2009)
Tuesday, November 10, 2009 - 4:00pm
Communications 202

What is the long-term nature of American foreign policy? U.S.

Trevor Griffey

Black Power at Work: Community Control, Affirmative Action, and the Construction Industry book cover
Black Power at Work: Community Control, Affirmative Action, and the Construction Industry (Cornell University Press, 2010)
Tuesday, November 16, 2010 - 4:00pm
Communications 202

Trevor Griffey, the book’s co-editor, will describe a previously overlooked but important part of Black Power  movement history: how the demand for

Ted Mack

Manufacturing Modern Japanese Literature: Publishing, Prizes, and the Ascription of Literary Value book cover
Manufacturing Modern Japanese Literature: Publishing, Prizes, and the Ascription of Literary Value (Duke University Press, 2010)
Tuesday, December 7, 2010 - 4:00pm
Communications 202

Emphasizing how modes of book production, promotion, and consumption shape ideas of literary value, Ted Mack examines the role of Japan’s publishin

Simon Werrett

Fireworks: Pyrotechnic Arts and Sciences in European History book cover
Fireworks: Pyrotechnic Arts and Sciences in European History (University of Chicago Press, 2010)
Tuesday, November 2, 2010 - 4:00pm
Communications 202

Fireworks are synonymous with celebration in the twenty-first century.

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provide UW faculty groups with leave to catalyze, deepen, or reconfigure cross-disciplinary research and to work toward publication.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

include speaker series, international research, and working conferences. They are selected for support based on their crossdisciplinary and interdisciplinary focus.

This series provides an opportunity for UW humanities scholars to discuss their recently published books.

seed new collaborations between faculty and graduate students who share research interests.

The Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities Series recognizes scholars in the humanities and emphasizes the role of the humanities in liberal education. The series is named after Solomon Katz, who served for 53 years at the UW, as an instructor, professor, Chair of the Department of History, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Provost, and Vice President for Academic Affairs. All Katz Lectures are free and open to the public. 

(formerly Graduate Interest Groups) encourage crossdisciplinary collaboration among graduate students through organized readings, screenings, dissertation working groups, and other activities.

are awarded for faculty, postdoctoral, and graduate research through both internal and external grants.  

are supported by small discretionary grants that facilitate opportunities for interdepartmental lectures, colloquia, and conferences at UW.

fund extended crossdisciplinary, collaborative projects that are often aligned with Simpson Center initiatives.

include the tri-annual Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities and the Joff Hanuaer Lectures in Western Civilization.

at the Simpson Center includes interdisciplinary graduate courses and the Certificate in Public Scholarship.

supports projects that promote collaboration between scholars and community partners in education, governmental, non-profit, and grassroots organizations.

stand at the leading edge of change by promoting collaborative, crossdisciplinary research and transformational scholarship.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy.

Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy.

Check here for a listing of scholarly blogs related to Simpson Center initiatives, programs, and projects.

Reading groups and microseminars with a number of UW faculty whose research interests dwell outside the usual purview of Asian American Studies.

In 2007, the Joff Hanauer Endowment for Excellence in Western Civilization was established through a gift from Seattle businessman and philanthropist Jerry Hanauer, in memory of his son. It supports two professorships and several graduate student fellowships in Western Civilization, in addition to a lecture series.

GIG

This initiative, launched in 2016, contributes to nationwide conversations about developing new approaches to doctoral education.

provide UW faculty groups with leave to catalyze, deepen, or reconfigure cross-disciplinary research and to work toward publication.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

include speaker series, international research, and working conferences. They are selected for support based on their crossdisciplinary and interdisciplinary focus.

This series provides an opportunity for UW humanities scholars to discuss their recently published books.

seed new collaborations between faculty and graduate students who share research interests.

The Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities Series recognizes scholars in the humanities and emphasizes the role of the humanities in liberal education. The series is named after Solomon Katz, who served for 53 years at the UW, as an instructor, professor, Chair of the Department of History, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Provost, and Vice President for Academic Affairs. All Katz Lectures are free and open to the public. 

(formerly Graduate Interest Groups) encourage crossdisciplinary collaboration among graduate students through organized readings, screenings, dissertation working groups, and other activities.

are awarded for faculty, postdoctoral, and graduate research through both internal and external grants.  

are supported by small discretionary grants that facilitate opportunities for interdepartmental lectures, colloquia, and conferences at UW.

fund extended crossdisciplinary, collaborative projects that are often aligned with Simpson Center initiatives.

include the tri-annual Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities and the Joff Hanuaer Lectures in Western Civilization.

at the Simpson Center includes interdisciplinary graduate courses and the Certificate in Public Scholarship.

supports projects that promote collaboration between scholars and community partners in education, governmental, non-profit, and grassroots organizations.

stand at the leading edge of change by promoting collaborative, crossdisciplinary research and transformational scholarship.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy.

art

Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy.

Check here for a listing of scholarly blogs related to Simpson Center initiatives, programs, and projects.

Reading groups and microseminars with a number of UW faculty whose research interests dwell outside the usual purview of Asian American Studies.

NEH

war

law

In 2007, the Joff Hanauer Endowment for Excellence in Western Civilization was established through a gift from Seattle businessman and philanthropist Jerry Hanauer, in memory of his son. It supports two professorships and several graduate student fellowships in Western Civilization, in addition to a lecture series.

PhD

This initiative, launched in 2016, contributes to nationwide conversations about developing new approaches to doctoral education.

The Novel Is Dead; Long Live the Anti-Novel

David Shields is Professor of English at the University of Washington and the bestselling author of twenty books, including Reality Hunger (named one of the best books of 2010 by more than thirty publications), The Thing About Life Is That One Day You’ll Be Dead (2008), and Black Planet (1999), a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award.

Tim Brown Awarded Humanities Without Walls Fellowship

Tim BrownTim Brown (Philosophy) has received a prestigious Humanities Without Walls fellowship to attend a three-week institute in Chicago this summer as one of 30 doctoral students selected nationwide.

New Cherniavsky Book “Neocitizenship” Examines “Political Culture after Democracy”

Eva CherniavskyEva Cherniavsky (English) has a new book about the changing meaning of citizenship in an era of US oligarchy, Neocitizenship: Political Culture after Democracy (NYU Press, 2017).

Spring 2017

Spring 2017 HUM courses

From Chicana Punk Rock, Habell-Pallán Forges a Vision for Public Scholarship

Habell-Pallan interviews Girl in a Coma in front of camera

The new director of the Certificate in Public Scholarship draws on the cultural ferment among musicians, scholars, and communities.

Atkins Authors First English Book on Medieval Japanese Poet Teika

AtkinsPaul Atkins (Asian Languages & Literature) has a new book with the University of Hawaiʻi Press about the influential Japanese poet Fujiwara no Teika (1162–1241). The book, Teika: The Life and Works of a Medieval Japanese Poet (2017), is the first book-length study of Teika in English.

From the publisher:

Race and Capitalism Receive Year-Long Investigation through $175,000 Sawyer Seminar Grant

Flags of four countries

An interdisciplinary group of faculty and graduate students examine the tangle of capitalism and race since the origins of European colonialism.

Call for Nominations: Barclay Simpson Prize for Scholarship in Public

Barclay Simpson

The Walter Chapin Simpson Center for the Humanities invites nominations of University of Washington faculty members for the Barclay Simpson Prize for Scholarship in Public. The award honors Barclay Simpson’s transformative gift in endowing the Simpson Center in memory of his father and highlights one of the center’s core missions: to foster the humanities as a public good.

2017-2018 Sawyer Seminar Postdoctoral Fellowship

Submission/Application Deadline: 
Fri, 02/10/2017 (All day)

The Washington Institute for the Study of Inequality and Race (WISIR) at the University of Washington is seeking applications for a one-year Andrew W. Mellon Sawyer Seminar Postdoctoral Fellowship on the topic of “Capitalism and Comparative Racialization.” We invite recent PhDs from the humanities and social sciences (from any institution) to apply for the 2017-2018 academic year. The fellowship carries a salary of $55,000 a year (plus health benefits).

Digital Humanities Summer Institute 2017 Attendees

For the sixth year, the Simpson Center co-sponsored the University of Victoria’s renowned Digital Humanities Summer Institute (DHSI).

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2017 Digital Humanities Summer Fellows

Digital Humanities Summer Fellowships support scholars pursuing research projects that use digital technologies in innovative and intensive ways. Meet the 2017 Fellows.

2017-2018 Society of Scholars

The Society of Scholars is an intellectual community of humanists of diverse ranks and disciplines who contribute to and learn from each other's work. Meet the 2017-18 Scholars.

Affiliated Faculty

The Certificate in Public Scholarship features a crossdisciplinary and cross-campus faculty advising network that supports student project and port

Black Embodiments Studio

Logo with "the Black Embodiments Studio" displayed over black background

The Black Embodiments Studio is a writing incubator and public lecture series that examines how definitions of blackness are produced and expressed through visual, aural, and affective realms—engaging three domains that underwrite the physical and metaphysical dimensions of inhabiting black skin.

Capitalism and Comparative Racialization

Female African American leaning on a stick placed in water. Hanging tapestries behind her.

This year-long program of lectures and discussion groups brings scholars together from across the University of Washington to explore the relationship between race and capitalism in the modern world.

Certificate in Public Scholarship

CPS students in seminar discussion

The Certificate in Public Scholarship brings together a crossdisciplinary cohort of UW graduate students and faculty interested in public scholarship, campus-community partnerships, community-engaged research, digital and multimedia publication, and profession development for careers inside or outside of higher education.

Comparative Study of Race

Photo of a protest, two signs that read "From Ferguson to Palestine Occupation is a Crime" and "Ferguson and Palestine Stop Apartheid Now"

The Comparative Study of Race graduate research cluster connects students across diverse fields to advance the critical and comparative study of race at the UW and other institutions.

Current Electives

Current elective for the Certificate in Public Scholarship

Disability Studies

Black and white photo from a protest. Protesters in wheelchairs, holding signs saying "We shall overcome" and "Access is a civil right"

Disability Studies is a growing field that approaches disability from a social justice perspective. It pushes back against a dominant narrative that disability is a condition to be cured or minimized through medical, technical, or other intervention.

Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century

Drawings of Victorian fashion trends throughout the 1800s

The Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century graduate research cluster brings together graduate students from English, Art History, Comparative Literature, Cinema & Media, French & Italian Studies, and other departments who research various aspects of the global middle-modernity period.

Fall 2017

Fall 2017 HUM courses.

Gender and Sexuality Studies

Drawing of five people with exchangeable body parts

We are a diverse group with a common goal: to create and maintain a supportive intellectual community that encourages a variety of rigorous work related to the topics of gender and sexuality.

Genomics Salon

Scroll, inkpot, and quill

The Genomics Salon graduate research cluster provides an informal forum for discussing subjects of general intellectual interest related to genomics and, more broadly, modern biology, in the spirit of Enlightenment-era French salons.

Historians at Work: Building Professional Networks

Image of historic book page overlaid with image of a sculpture on the side of a UW building

Historians at Work: Building Professional Networks is an ongoing internship project that encourages graduate students in the Department of History to explore alternative career routes with partner institutions.

Improvisational Crossings: Social Dance as Interdisciplinary Intervention

Man dancing in a club

This two-day colloquium, open to the public, examines dances of togetherness, or “together dancing,” asking how connections and divisions between people and groups can work as both lens and method for engaging interdisciplinary inquiry.

Interdisciplinary and Transnational Feminist Approaches to 'the Private'

Collaged image of a head, with images of eyeballs and abstract drawings

Together we are interested in exploring a feminist, cross-disciplinary study of the concept of privacy through the lens of intersectionality.

International Comic Arts Forum

ICAF 2017 logo with cat and pen

The 2017 International Comic Arts Forum highlights the latest research in the study of comic art through three days of dual-track academic panels, coupled with roundtable discussions, artist talks, and moderated presentations.

Mellon Summer Fellows for New Graduate Seminars in the Humanities

Mellon Summer Fellowships for New Graduate Seminars in the Humanities support the development of new courses by UW faculty for doctoral students wh

Mellon Summer Fellows for Public Projects in the Humanities

Summer Fellowships for Public Projects in the Humanities support graduate-student research projects that collaborate with or otherwise meaningfully

Memory Construction and Emotion in India, Past and Present

Watercolor of figures in royal court with text

This symposium examines how Hindu, Muslim, and Jain cultural self-understandings were shaped in India’s past and how that relates to the present.

Modernist Studies

Lithograph of soldiers marching

The Modernist Studies graduate research cluster brings together scholars from various departments and the community to discuss literary, visual, and historical texts related to the late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century.

New Scholarly Practices, Broader Career Paths in Near & Middle Eastern Studies

Old-fashioned keys

This project works to change the conversation in the Interdisciplinary Near & Middle Eastern Studies PhD Program about the role of public scholarship, digital humanities, and new media publications in building a career as a humanities scholar.

Poetics of Subaltern Life-Worlds: New Research, New Imaginaries of Informal Economies in Contemporary India

Three females photographed outside an Indian home

This workshop brings together scholars engaged in research breaking new ground in how to think about the contours of informal economies in India and beyond.

Resource Sharing Across Departmental Modern-Language PhD Programs

Multi-colored cubes drawn over a topographical map

This Next Generation Humanities PhD program coordinates efforts across six modern-language departments to intelligently revamp their PhD programs on a scale that is appropriate for each, but from which all can benefit.

Society of Scholars

The Society of Scholars is an intellectual community of humanists of diverse generations, academic ranks, and departmental affiliations who contribute to and learn from one another's work. The group meets biweekly throughout the year to discuss their current research. It is composed of faculty, graduate students, and postdoctoral fellows.

Summer Institute on Global Indigeneities

Navigational stick chart

Graduate students and faculty from across universities gather to focus on the intellectual and institutional challenges of articulating indigenous studies.

Texts and Teachers

High school classroom, two students raising their hands and smiling

Texts and Teachers is a curriculum-development program and university/high school collaboration offering dual-credit linked classes to more than 400 high school students

The Anthropocene

B-Reactor at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation

This research cluster brings together faculty and graduate students to consider the provocations and implications of the Anthropocene thesis for the humanities.

The Past, Present, and Future of US Global Health Partnerships in Africa

Outside of Infectious Diseases Institute, logo with words "celebration of partnership" inside yellow and green circle

The term “partnership” has become a core value in the field of global health over the past fifteen years, signaling a rejection of older, more paternalistic modes of Western health interventions in Africa. We examine this term.

Visualizations and Dialogues in Art and Biophysics

Microscopic image of umbilical cells

Rebecca Cummins (Art) and Linda Wordeman (Physiology & Biophysics) embark on a transdisciplinary dialogue related to the intersections of art and biophysics. In Wordeman’s lab, microscopic techniques result in quantitative live imaging utilize

Women Who Rock

Women Who Rock logo; a woman coming out of a lotus surrounded by a radio tower, movie camera, and film reels

Women Who Rock examines the politics of performance, social identity, and material access in music scenes, cultures, and industries.

Writing Across Difference

Abstract painting of curly-ques in rainbow colors

With a dual focus on developing scholarship and teaching resources, the group explores ways that power and difference (linguistic, cultural, disciplinary, and otherwise) are at work in writing and other forms of communication.

Robin D.G. Kelley

Robin Kelley
What Is Racial Capitalism and Why Does It Matter?
Tuesday, November 7, 2017 - 7:00pm
Kane Hall 210

Robin D.G. Kelley discusses the genesis of the concept of racial capitalism and the important contributions that scholar Cedric Robinson made to understanding race and the making of the global capitalist order over the course of the last 700 years.

Paul Farmer

Paul Farmer
Wednesday, February 7, 2018 - 7:00pm
Kane Hall 120

Medical anthropologist and physician Paul Farmer has dedicated his life to improving health care for the world's poorest people.

Brian Reed

Brian Reed
Thursday, March 1, 2018 - 7:00pm
Kane Hall 210

Brian Reed is Professor and Chair of English at the University of Washington. He is a specialist in twentieth- and twenty-first-century poetry and poetics and the author of three books.

Charles W. Mills

Charles Mills
Race and Capitalism
Wednesday, May 16, 2018 - 7:00pm
Kane Hall 210

Charles W. Mills speaks on race and capitalism as part of “Capitalism and Comparative Racialization,” a John E. Sawyer Seminar on the Comparative Study of Cultures.

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