Programs tagged with 'any keyword'

Jose Antonio Lucero

Struggles of Voice: The Politics of Indigenous Representation in the Andes book cover
Struggles of Voice: The Politics of Indigenous Representation in the Andes (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2008)
Tuesday, May 12, 2009 - 4:00pm
Communications 202

Reception to follow.

Modern Girl Around the World Research Group

The Modern Girl Around the World: Consumption, Modernity, and Globalization book cover
The Modern Girl Around the World: Consumption, Modernity, and Globalization (Duke University Press, 2008)
Wednesday, April 29, 2009 - 4:00pm
Communications 202

Editors: Alys Weinbaum (English), Lynn Thomas (History), Priti Ramamurthy (Women Studies),

Ronald Moore

Natural Beauty: A Theory of Aesthetics Beyond the Arts book cover
Natural Beauty: A Theory of Aesthetics Beyond the Arts (Broadview Press, 2007)
Wednesday, April 8, 2009 - 4:00pm
Communications 202

A philosophical account of the principles involved in making aesthetic judgments about natural objects, Natural Beauty: A Theory of Aesthetics

Davinder Bhowmik

Writing Okinawa: Narrative Acts of Identity and Resistance book cover
Writing Okinawa: Narrative Acts of Identity and Resistance (Routledge, 2008)
Tuesday, February 3, 2009 - 4:00pm
Communications 202

Writing Okinawa: Narrative Acts of Identity and Resistance is the first comprehensive English-language study of Okinawan fiction, from its

Hazard Adams

Academic Child book cover
Academic Child (McFarland & Company, 2008)
Thursday, January 15, 2009 - 3:30pm
Communications 202

Hazard Adams’ most recent book, Academic Child, tells the story of a life-long professional career in education and academics.

Janelle Taylor

The Public Life of the Fetal Sonogram: Technology, Consumption and the Politics of Reproduction book cover
The Public Life of the Fetal Sonogram: Technology, Consumption and the Politics of Reproduction (Rutgers University Press, 2008)
Wednesday, December 3, 2008 - 4:00pm
Communications 202

In The Public Life of the Fetal Sonogram, Janelle Taylor (Anthropology) analyzes ultrasound technology and imagery in its

Shannon Dudley

Music From Behind the Bridge: Steelband and Spirit and Politics in Trinidad and Tobago
Tuesday, October 7, 2008 - 4:00pm
Communications 202

In his most recent book, Music From Behind the Bridge: Steelband Spirit and Politics in Trinidad and Tobago, Shannon Dudley examines the r

Mikkel Borch-Jacobsen

Making Minds and Madness: From Hysteria to Depression book cover
Making Minds and Madness: From Hysteria to Depression (Cambridge, 2009)
Wednesday, February 24, 2010 - 4:00pm
Communications 202

Why do “maladies of the soul” such as hysteria, anxiety disorders, or depression wax and wane over time?

Gillian Harkins

Everybody’s Family Romance: Reading Incest in Neoliberal America book cover
Everybody’s Family Romance: Reading Incest in Neoliberal America (University of Minnesota Press, 2009)
Thursday, March 11, 2010 - 4:00pm
Communications 202

More than just a portrait of their author, memoirs and autobiographical novels offer insight into the political, economic, and social climates of t

Zev Handel

Old Chinese Medials and their Sino-Tibetan Origins: A Comparative Study book cover
Old Chinese Medials and their Sino-Tibetan Origins: A Comparative Study (Institute of Linguistics, Academia Sinica, 2009)
Tuesday, May 4, 2010 - 4:00pm
Communications 202

Working to redefine our understanding of the pronunciation of Old Chinese, Zev Handel’s newest work, Old Chinese Medials and their Sino-Tibetan

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provide UW faculty groups with leave to catalyze, deepen, or reconfigure cross-disciplinary research and to work toward publication.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

include speaker series, international research, and working conferences. They are selected for support based on their crossdisciplinary and interdisciplinary focus.

This series provides an opportunity for UW humanities scholars to discuss their recently published books.

seed new collaborations between faculty and graduate students who share research interests.

The Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities Series recognizes scholars in the humanities and emphasizes the role of the humanities in liberal education. The series is named after Solomon Katz, who served for 53 years at the UW, as an instructor, professor, Chair of the Department of History, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Provost, and Vice President for Academic Affairs. All Katz Lectures are free and open to the public. 

encourage crossdisciplinary collaboration among graduate students through organized readings, screenings, dissertation working groups, and other activities.

are awarded for faculty, postdoctoral, and graduate research through both internal and external grants.  

are supported by small discretionary grants that facilitate opportunities for interdepartmental lectures, colloquia, and conferences at UW.

fund extended crossdisciplinary, collaborative projects that are often aligned with Simpson Center initiatives.

include the tri-annual Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities and the Joff Hanuaer Lectures in Western Civilization.

at the Simpson Center includes interdisciplinary graduate courses and the Certificate in Public Scholarship.

supports projects that promote collaboration between scholars and community partners in education, governmental, non-profit, and grassroots organizations.

stand at the leading edge of change by promoting collaborative, crossdisciplinary research and transformational scholarship.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy.

Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy.

Check here for a listing of scholarly blogs related to Simpson Center initiatives, programs, and projects.

Reading groups and microseminars with a number of UW faculty whose research interests dwell outside the usual purview of Asian American Studies.

In 2007, the Joff Hanauer Endowment for Excellence in Western Civilization was established through a gift from Seattle businessman and philanthropist Jerry Hanauer, in memory of his son. It supports two professorships and several graduate student fellowships in Western Civilization, in addition to a lecture series.

GIG

provide UW faculty groups with leave to catalyze, deepen, or reconfigure cross-disciplinary research and to work toward publication.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

include speaker series, international research, and working conferences. They are selected for support based on their crossdisciplinary and interdisciplinary focus.

This series provides an opportunity for UW humanities scholars to discuss their recently published books.

seed new collaborations between faculty and graduate students who share research interests.

The Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities Series recognizes scholars in the humanities and emphasizes the role of the humanities in liberal education. The series is named after Solomon Katz, who served for 53 years at the UW, as an instructor, professor, Chair of the Department of History, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Provost, and Vice President for Academic Affairs. All Katz Lectures are free and open to the public. 

encourage crossdisciplinary collaboration among graduate students through organized readings, screenings, dissertation working groups, and other activities.

are awarded for faculty, postdoctoral, and graduate research through both internal and external grants.  

are supported by small discretionary grants that facilitate opportunities for interdepartmental lectures, colloquia, and conferences at UW.

fund extended crossdisciplinary, collaborative projects that are often aligned with Simpson Center initiatives.

include the tri-annual Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities and the Joff Hanuaer Lectures in Western Civilization.

at the Simpson Center includes interdisciplinary graduate courses and the Certificate in Public Scholarship.

supports projects that promote collaboration between scholars and community partners in education, governmental, non-profit, and grassroots organizations.

stand at the leading edge of change by promoting collaborative, crossdisciplinary research and transformational scholarship.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy.

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Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy.

Check here for a listing of scholarly blogs related to Simpson Center initiatives, programs, and projects.

Reading groups and microseminars with a number of UW faculty whose research interests dwell outside the usual purview of Asian American Studies.

NEH

war

law

In 2007, the Joff Hanauer Endowment for Excellence in Western Civilization was established through a gift from Seattle businessman and philanthropist Jerry Hanauer, in memory of his son. It supports two professorships and several graduate student fellowships in Western Civilization, in addition to a lecture series.

Humanitarian Jihad and the Problem with Essentializing Islam (Video)

Kashmiri militants tell UW anthropologist Cabeiri Robinson why they put down weapons and picked up shovels after a devastating earthquake.

Reimagining the Humanities PhD and Reaching New Publics

Professors talk in seminar room

A new program forges innovative forms of scholarship and teaching beyond traditional academic circles, supported by a four-year grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Introducing Reimagining the Humanities PhD and Reaching New Publics

A new program forges innovative forms of scholarship and teaching beyond traditional academic circles, supported by a four-year grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Rachel Arteaga

Rachel Arteaga is Assistant Program Director for Reimagining the Humanities PhD and Reaching New Publics. She completed the Certificate in Public Scholarship in June 2015 at the University of Washington, where she is completing her doctorate in English.

Disability Studies

Disability studies is a quickly growing field that approaches disability from a social-justice perspective.

Reading and Writing Affect

Reading and Writing Affect is a monthly reading group and writing workshop that offers a thorough overview of the current field of affect theory and related discourses

Affect & Audience in the Digital Age: Translational Poetics

Illustration of book index

This symposium examines artistic, archival, and activist projects that move from the digital to the analog, from embodied performance to notation.

Suhanthie Motha Wins Book Award for Race, Empire, and English Language Teaching

Suhanthie Motha (English) has won the 2015 Critics' Choice Book Award from the American Educational Studies Association.

Seattle’s Freeway Revolt: A Living Legacy of Civic Activism

In the late 1960s and early 1970s, Seattle citizens joined together to oppose the construction and expansion of freeways that would have destroyed the heart of Seattle.

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2014-15 Co-Sponsored Community Events

Each year the Simpson Center supports events in the greater Seattle community with small discretionary grants.Learn

2014-15 Co-Sponsored UW Events

Each year the Simpson Center co-sponsors dozens of interdepartmental speaker events and conferences with small discretionary grants. 

2015-2016 Society of Scholars

The Society of Scholars is an intellectual community of humanists of diverse generations, academic ranks, and departmental affiliations who contribute to and learn from one another's work. Meet the 2015-16 Scholars.

Access to Information as a Human Right

This conference with the UW Center for Human Rights examines access to information as a tool in securing truth, justice, and reparations for victims of crimes against humanity.

Affect & Audience in the Digital Age: Translational Poetics

Illustration of book index

This symposium examines artistic, archival, and activist projects that move from the digital to the analog, from embodied performance to notation.

African Media and Materialities

The African Media and Materialities research group focuses on media and materialities to bring together several strands of thought and research.

Certificate in Public Scholarship

CPS students in seminar discussion

The Certificate in Public Scholarship brings together a crossdisciplinary cohort of UW graduate students and faculty interested in public scholarship, campus-community partnerships, community-engaged research, digital and multimedia publication, and profession development for careers inside or outside of higher education.

Comics Studies

Comics have entered university curricula and multiple annual conferences, such as the International Comic Arts Forum, specialize in comics scholarship.

Digital Humanities

DH elevator button courtesy Quinn Dombrowski via Creative Commons/Flickr

Integrating computer technologies with humanities research. Using computational tools to retrieve, analyze, and visually represent data.

Digital Humanities Summer Fellowships

Digital Humanities Summer Fellowships support scholars pursuing research projects that use digital technologies in innovative and intensive ways and/or explore the historical, social, aesthetic, and cross-cultural implications of digital cultures. 

Digital Humanities Summer Institute 2016 Attendees

For the fifth year, the Simpson Center sponsored the University of Victoria’s renowned Digital Humanities Summer Institute (DHSI).

Disability Studies

Disability studies is a quickly growing field that approaches disability from a social-justice perspective.

Effable and Ineffable: Gabriel Fauré and the Limits of Criticism

Beloved by musicians yet inaccessible to scholars, Fauré's music provides a unique focal point for rethinking the relationship between music and discourse.

Ethnographic Aesthetics: Image, Sound, Word

Birds flying above ocean

Ethnographic Aesthetics is a speaker series featuring innovators whose work in poetry, sound, and film expands the practice of ethnography through humanistic, sensory forms of knowing.

Feminism and Classics

Illustration of eye and Venus de Medici

Feminism and Classics is a conference exploring the multiple interconnections among the cultures of the ancient Mediterranean and the study of feminism, women, and gender.

Hebrew and the Humanities

Alphabet blocks with Hebrew characters

The symposium Hebrew and the Humanities: Present Tense examines the experience of Americans who have traversed the cultural distance from English to Hebrew. Why do they do it? What is its value? How does the embattled position of Hebrew reflect the broader challenges of language arts and humanities education today?

Histories and Futures of Publication

Histories and Futures of Publication is an interdisciplinary lecture and colloquium series in manuscript, print, and digital cultures.

HUM Courses

The Simpson Center offers courses at the graduate level that reflect its commitments to crossdisciplinary research, digital humanities, and public scholarship.

 

International Piers Plowman Society Conference

Piers Plowman Luttrell Psalter

The International Piers Plowman Society meets to foster critical study of the poem(s) Piers Plowman, a fourteenth-century alliterative narrative told in a series of dream visions.

Intersectional Animal Studies: Thinking Humans and Animals Together

Following scholarship on intersectionality, a particularly powerful analytic tool for understanding identity formation and experience, we argue that species can be added to—and can intersect with—gender, race, class, ethnicity, and sexuality, to better understand how vectors of power and privilege are formed and how we might start to shift them in the direction of greater social justice.

Lake Union Laboratory

Lake Union Laboratory: Curating Collaborative Urban Research in the Digital Realm supports a cross-disciplinary team exploring the potential for digital platforms and tools to generate new transdisciplinary knowledges in and of ur

Mediating Difference: Sights and Sounds

Difference is a term that late twentieth and early twenty-first century scholars of race, gender, and sexuality have claimed and yet left largely un-theorized.

Medieval Studies

Canterbury Tales folio image

The Medieval Studies Graduate Interest Group fosters collaboration between disciplines on topics concerning the Middle Ages by bringing together medieval scholars from diverse departments on campus and the community.

Moving Images

The Moving Images graduate interest group brings together students from a variety of departments focused on the study of moving images, including narrative and documentary film as well as television and new media.

Palestine and the Public Sphere

This research cluster brings together faculty and graduate students for critical and cross-disciplinary conversations and activities concerning the cultural, political, and economic situation of Palestine and its framing in U.S.

Performance Studies Research Group

The Performance Studies Research Group draws together scholars from various disciplines to discuss foundational and new work in the field of performance studies.

Producing a Worthy Illness

IV bags with social media logos

For Americans experiencing chronic and acute illnesses, fundraising through crowdsourcing websites has become a popular method to pay for the extraordinary costs of health care and medication. This project studies these new forms of self-representation from the perspectives of public health, medical anthropology, and media and communication studies.

Public Scholarship

The Simpson Center advances scholarship as a publicly engaged practice, promoting mutually beneficial partnerships between higher education and organizations in the public and private sectors and providing pathways for scholars to share their academic work with broader public audiences.

Reading and Writing Affect

Reading and Writing Affect is a monthly reading group and writing workshop that offers a thorough overview of the current field of affect theory and related discourses

Reimagining the Humanities PhD and Reaching New Publics

Professors talk in seminar room

A new program forges innovative forms of scholarship and teaching beyond traditional academic circles, supported by a four-year grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Science, Technology & Society Studies

Science, Technology & Society Studies certificate logo

An interdisciplinary graduate certificate program in Science, Technology & Society Studies (STSS) welcomes its first cohort in the 2015-16 academic year, with 14 students from eight departments beginning the new program.

SeaTac-Seattle Minimum Wage Campaign History Project

The SeaTac-Seattle Minimum Wage Campaign History Project produces a digital web archive documenting the two successful historic struggles for a $15 minimum wage as well as continuing advocacy for better wages, sick pay, reduction

Seattle’s Freeway Revolt: A Living Legacy of Civic Activism

In the late 1960s and early 1970s, Seattle citizens joined together to oppose the construction and expansion of freeways that would have destroyed the heart of Seattle.

Socially Engaged Art in Japan

The symposium Socially Engaged Art in Japan explores work that crosses the boundaries between art and social activism and how Japan’s experience can inform a global understanding of such work.

Society of Scholars

The Society of Scholars is an intellectual community of humanists of diverse generations, academic ranks, and departmental affiliations who contribute to and learn from one another's work. The group meets biweekly throughout the year to discuss their current research. It is composed of faculty, graduate students, and postdoctoral fellows.

Space, Movement, and Translation

Space, Movement, and Translation brings together a diverse group of graduate students from different disciplines and backgrounds interested in novel ways of representing historical movement, space, and translation in scholarship.

Summer Institute in the Arts & Humanities

Created in collaboration by the UW’s Undergraduate Research Program and the Simpson Center, the Summer Institute in the Arts & Humanities provides twenty competitively-selected undergraduates an intensive opportunity to engage in primary interdisciplinary research.

Teaching with Technology

Teaching with Technology brings together graduate teaching assistants from various departments to discuss and develop technology-based teaching tools and lessons.

The Politics of Storytelling in Island Imperial Formations

Javanese outrigger canoe, courtesy of Judith Henchy, Southeast Asia Collection, UW Libraries.

Politics of Storytelling is an essay collection that builds a theoretical language about the form and function of storytelling in the historical creation and recreation of modern island formations

Troubling Translations

Cortes Marina

Our research cluster pursues the questioning of translation as a way of enlarging our understanding of the humanities and the social sciences.

Unmapping Global Studies

Unmapping Global Studies advances the critical study of Oceania and the global mobilities of Pacific Islanders and all native peoples.

Winter 2016

Winter 2016 HUM courses

Christof Mauch

How Vulnerable Is Our World? Environmental Sustainability and Lessons from the Past
Wednesday, December 2, 2015 - 7:00pm
Kane Hall 210

Christof Mauch is a distinguished environmental historian and director of the Rachel Carson Center for Environment & Society in Munich, Germany, one of the world’s largest research centers for the environmental humanities and social sciences.

Lauren Berlant

On Humorlessness
Wednesday, March 2, 2016 - 7:00pm
Kane Hall 210

Lauren Berlant is the George M. Pullman Distinguished Service Professor of English at the University of Chicago.

Alison Wylie

What Knowers Know Well: Why Feminism Matters to Archaeology
Thursday, May 19, 2016 - 7:00pm
Kane Hall 210

Alison Wylie is Professor of Philosophy and Anthropology at the University of Washington. Her abiding interest as a philosopher of science is in questions about how we know what we (think) we know.