Alumni - Certificate in Public Scholarship


Rachel Arteaga (English)
Portfolio Advisor: Miriam Bartha (Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences, UW Bothell)
Entrance Year: 2012
Completion Year: 2015

Rachel Arteaga’s dissertation research focuses on feelings of faith—among them, hope, doubt, and joy—in American literature. Rachel has worked in a variety of programs whose fundamental purpose is to build bridges between the UW and other educational institutions, including liaison for UW in the High Schools, Texts and Teachers, and her Certificate practicum project, Spar, in which she collaborated with high school English instructors in rural Grays Harbor County, to adapt the tools and methods of the digital humanities for classroom use. She is currently Assistant Program Director for Reimagining the Humanities PhD and Reaching New Publics, a Mellon-funded grant at the Simpson Center for the Humanities.

Capstone Portfolio (UW access only): http://sites.google.com/a/uw.edu/cps-portfolio-archive-arteaga-rachel-k/

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Lillian Campbell (English)
Portfolio Advisor: Miriam Bartha (Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences, UW Bothell)
Entrance Year: 2011
Completion Year: 2014

Lilly Campbell’s research focuses on the role of language in framing women’s health movements, historically and in the present day. She studies the rhetorics of public texts, and is interested in how the relationships between scientific, feminist, and other discourses shapes the insiders and outsiders of these movements. Lilly is also fascinated by composition pedagogy and the interactions between different teaching paradigms in composition curriculum. She has taught introductory composition in both conventional and computer-integrated classrooms and has contributed to curriculum development and to graduate student instructor training as Assistant Director of the Expository Writing Program.

Capstone Portfolio (UW access only): https://sites.google.com/a/uw.edu/cps-portfolio-archive-campbell-lilly/

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Maurice Dolberry (Education)
Portfolio Advisor: Ralina Joseph (Communication)
Entrance Year: 2011
Completion Year: 2013

Maurice Dolberry’s scholarly interests are at the intersection of hip-hop epistemology, critical media literacy, and critical and culturally responsive pedagogy, and their use in curriculum development and teacher training for science educators.  He is also concerned with informing practice, practitioners, and communities in an effort to reform educational practices that contribute to the disproportionate performances of Black American children in schools. Before graduate school, Maurice spent three years as a middle school educator and eight years as a high school educator in various roles, including science teacher, math teacher, dean of students, and director of diversity.

Capstone portfolio: https://sites.google.com/a/uw.edu/cps-portfolio-archive-dolberry-maurice/

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Annie Dwyer (English)
Portfolio Advisor: Anis Bawarshi (English)
Entrance Year: 2011
Completion Year: 2014

Annie Dwyer studies late nineteenth and early twentieth century literature and culture, focusing on transformations in the configuration of the human/animal divide and the production of “human” difference through the discourse of animality.  Before coming to the University of Washington, Annie worked as an AmeriCorps volunteer, developing and implementing literacy programming in south King County. Annie has taught, created curriculum, and facilitated teacher training workshops with University Beyond Bars and Freedom Education Project Puget Sound, college education programs in Washington State prisons.

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Melanie Hernandez (English)
Portfolio Advisor: Ralina Joseph (Communication)
Entrance Year: 2010
Completion Year: 2013

Melanie Hernandez’s scholarship takes a comparative ethnic studies approach to the “passing” genre in African American and Chicano literary historiographies, with a particular focus on narratives about miscegenation and racial hybridity. In her scholarship, she tracks inconsistencies in U.S. attitudes toward racial intermixture(s) at concurrent historical moments across distinct geographical landscapes. She has designed and taught an array of American and transatlantic literature courses for the Department of English on topics that include: passing narratives, American frontier mythology, nineteenth-century pseudoscience, and the Gothic. She is currently Acting Instructor in the Department of English.

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Jessie Kindig (History)
Graduate Student Representative, Certificate in Public Scholarship Steering Committee
Honorary Fellow

Jessie Kindig’s scholarship examines the constructions of American empire in East Asia during the Korean War and how a “postwar Pacific” was formed in the American imagination, reworking American ideas of racial integration and masculinity. Jessie is an associate editor of the Pacific Northwest Civil Rights and Labor History Projects, a set of collaborative projects based at the University of Washington that bring undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, and community members together to chronicle traditions of social movement activism and everyday life in Washington State.  She received a 2010 Publicly Active Graduate Education (PAGE) fellowship from Imagining America: Artists and Scholars in Public Life. She is currently Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of History at Indiana University Bloomington, and Assistant Editor for the Journal of American History.

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Sasha Lotas (Education)
Portfolio Advisor: Anis Bawarshi (English)
Entrance Year: 2010
Completion Year: 2013

Sasha Lotas studies adolescent and adult literacy. She spent ten years in Washington, DC, developing postsecondary preparation programs for adults and teenagers without high school degrees prior to her graduate studies in the Learning Sciences at the College of Education. She works at North Seattle Community College (NSCC) as a writing tutor, and received a 2010-2011 Huckabay Teaching Fellowship to create and implement new developmental writing-curriculum based on her research at NSCC. Sasha also tutors students at Seattle Education Access, a non-profit organization providing higher education advocacy and opportunity to marginalized youth, and is a member of UW’s Studio Design Pedagogy Research Group, a team of learning scientists and landscape architects examining the use of studio pedagogy within higher education.   

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Alice Pedersen (English)
Portfolio Advisor: Miriam Bartha (Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences, UW Bothell)
Entrance Year: 2010
Completion Year: 2014

Alice Pedersen’s scholarship focuses on nineteenth-century American literature, with special attention to citizenship and rights discourses. She is interested in literature produced in and out of moments of violence and struggle, and in considering how that literature intersects with theories of rights and the subject. Before coming to the University of Washington, Alice worked as an AmeriCorps volunteer, developing and implementing literacy and creative writing programming in local public schools and non-profits. Alice has served as Assistant Director with the Expository Writing Program at UW Seattle, Chair for the Endorsement in Critical Instruction program, and a Fellow with the Project for Interdisciplinary Pedagogy. She is currently a Lecturer in the School of Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences at UW Bothell.

Capstone portfolio (UW access only): http://sites.google.com/a/uw.edu/cps-portfolio-archive-pedersen-alice/

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Amy Piedalue (Geography)
Portfolio Advisor: Amanda Locke Swarr (Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies)
Entrance Year: 2010
Completion Year: 2016

In her capstone, Amy argues that "publicly engaged scholarship interested in social justice issues contributes to those aims best through collaborative praxis based in feminist, critical race, and anti-oppression epistemologies. Such praxis can benefit from the skills and privileges of university-based scholars, but works to undo hierarchies of expert knowledge that presume the superior analytical capacity of intellectual elites by recognizing and valuing sites of struggles as sites of theory production and collective knowledge-making.

For her practicum, Amy conducted a mid-term assessment of an ongoing community-based, collaborative research project, coordinated through the Peaceful Families Taskforce (PFT), a program of API Chaya. The practicum engaged critical, collaborative reflection in two respects: to assess the progress of the research project itself and to consider the role of reflection and other self-reflexive practices in the formation and daily work of research that follows a community-based, participatory model. This collaboration extended into a co-authored dissertation chapter with the research partners, Farah Abdul and Sarah Rizvi.

Amy is a research postdoc with the Australia India Institute at the University of Melbourne.

Capstone Portfolio: https://sites.google.com/site/cpsportfolioarchivepiedalueamy/cps-capstone.

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Nicole Robert (Gender, Women, & Sexuality Studies)
Portfolio Advisor: Ron Krabill (Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences, UW Bothell)
Entrance Year: 2011
Completion Year: 2013

Nicole brings a background in museology to her research, which looks at how normalizing ideologies construct race, gender and sexuality in U.S. history museums. Her research puts queer and feminist theories in conversation with museum practices, an intervention that she is calling Critical Feminist Museology. Nicole co-founded the Queering the Museum (QTM) project, which works collaboratively to facilitate critical dialogue between community members, community organizations, and museum practitioners to address the role that museums play in forming social norms around gender, race and sexuality. Current work includes a digital storytelling workshop, a "Queering the (History) Museum" symposium, and a queer-themed history exhibit.  She has held the Huckabay and Project of Interdisciplinary Pedagogy Teaching Fellowships.

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