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Digital Humanities Resources: On-Campus and Online

Curious to learn more about digital humanities scholarship? This list of digital humanities resources, created by the Simpson Center’s web tech Dana Bublitz, may be useful to anyone currently involved in or considering getting started with digital humanities scholarship at the UW. It includes information about both on-campus and online resources.

Call for Nominations: Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities

The Simpson Center is currently accepting nominations of UW faculty and visiting scholars for the Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities series for the 2014-15 academic year. The deadline is Nov. 15. 2013.

Histories and Futures of the Book: Exploring Reading and Writing in the Digital Age

Histories and Futures of the Book is a 2013-14 interdisciplinary lecture series in manuscript, print, and digital culture taking place in conjunction with the annual meeting of the Society for Textual Scholarship (STS), March 20-22, 2014, at the UW. Organized by Jeffrey Knight (English) and Geoffrey Turnovsky (French & Italian), the lecture series and conference welcomes distinguished scholars from across the country whose work on the materiality of books and media intersects with big-picture debates about the place of the humanities, innovation in graduate education, and public scholarship.

Public Scholar Profile: Maurice Dolberry

Maurice Dolberry is the first UW student to complete the graduate Certificate in Public Scholarship (CPS) through the Simpson Center. Dolberry, who entered the program in Fall 2011, completed his Certificate in Spring 2013 with the guidance of his CPS portfolio advisor Ralina Joseph (Communication).  This year Dolberry is continuing as a doctoral student in Curriculum & Instruction/Multicultural Education in the UW College of Education. As part of the certificate program, Dolberry worked closely with Joseph and fellow CPS student Melanie Hernandez (English) to lay the groundwork for a sustainable partnership between the Northwest African American Museum (NAAM) and the graduate and undergraduate sections of UW Black Cultural Studies courses. Prior to entering the PhD program, he spent three years as a middle school educator and eight years as a high school educator in various roles, including science teacher, math teacher, dean of students, and director of diversity.

Fall Funding Round Application Deadline: Nov. 15, 2013

This year’s submission deadline for the Simpson Center’s Fall Funding Round is Nov. 15. Funding covers the term July 2014-June 2015. 

New Summer Digital Humanities Commons Research Fellowships at the Simpson Center

The Simpson Center’s Summer Digital Humanities Commons Fellowships support scholars pursuing research projects that use digital technologies in innovative and intensive ways and/or explore the historical, social, aesthetic, and cross-cultural implications of digital cultures. Applications will be accepted starting Oct. 15 for the Summer 2014 fellowship term. The deadline is Nov. 15.

Announcing the UW's 2013-14 HASTAC Scholars

The Simpson Center has nominated ten graduate students to serve as HASTAC Scholars for the 2013-14 academic year, based on their advancement of digital scholarship at the UW.

The Future of the Environmental Humanities

The Future of the Environmental Humanities, a multi-day conference taking place at the UW Oct. 31-Nov. 3, seeks to spark the emergence of a regional network of environmental humanities scholars, who will come together to understand how the humanities may contribute to civic conversations about environmental change and to better define the place that the academic humanities have in this process.  The conference’s keynote addresses—a Walker Ames lecture by Lawrence Buell (Harvard University) and a talk by Ursula Heise (University of California, Los Angeles) are free and open to the public.

Affect & Audience in the Digital Age

Affect & Audience in the Digital Age is a symposium and performance event exploring the aesthetics of digital meditation in contemporary poetry. While poets have long been expected to connect with readers through carefully constructed emotional appeals, much poetic work is now written through impersonal digital methodologies such as crowd sourcing and data mining. Yet digitally mediated poetry can still have a particular affective density: even appropriated text from the Internet can convey the “powerful feelings” that Wordsworth described as the ideal for poetry.

Miriam Bartha to Join UW Bothell Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences as Director of Graduate Programs

After nine years at the Simpson Center, Miriam Bartha has accepted a new position as Director of Graduate Programs in the School of Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences (IAS) at the University of Washington, Bothell. She will assume her new responsibilities beginning August 2013. 

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provide UW faculty groups with leave to catalyze, deepen, or reconfigure cross-disciplinary research and to work toward publication.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

include speaker series, international research, and working conferences. They are selected for support based on their crossdisciplinary and interdisciplinary focus.

This series provides an opportunity for UW humanities scholars to discuss their recently published books.

seed new collaborations between faculty and graduate students who share research interests.

The Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities Series recognizes scholars in the humanities and emphasizes the role of the humanities in liberal education. The series is named after Solomon Katz, who served for 53 years at the UW, as an instructor, professor, Chair of the Department of History, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Provost, and Vice President for Academic Affairs. All Katz Lectures are free and open to the public. 

encourage crossdisciplinary collaboration among graduate students through organized readings, screenings, dissertation working groups, and other activities.

are awarded for faculty, postdoctoral, and graduate research through both internal and external grants.  

are supported by small discretionary grants that facilitate opportunities for interdepartmental lectures, colloquia, and conferences at UW.

fund extended crossdisciplinary, collaborative projects that are often aligned with Simpson Center initiatives.

include the tri-annual Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities and the Joff Hanuaer Lectures in Western Civilization.

at the Simpson Center includes interdisciplinary graduate courses and the Certificate in Public Scholarship.

supports projects that promote collaboration between scholars and community partners in education, governmental, non-profit, and grassroots organizations.

stand at the leading edge of change by promoting collaborative, crossdisciplinary research and transformational scholarship.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy.

Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy.

Check here for a listing of scholarly blogs related to Simpson Center initiatives, programs, and projects.

Reading groups and microseminars with a number of UW faculty whose research interests dwell outside the usual purview of Asian American Studies.

In 2007, the Joff Hanauer Endowment for Excellence in Western Civilization was established through a gift from Seattle businessman and philanthropist Jerry Hanauer, in memory of his son. It supports two professorships and several graduate student fellowships in Western Civilization, in addition to a lecture series.

GIG

provide UW faculty groups with leave to catalyze, deepen, or reconfigure cross-disciplinary research and to work toward publication.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

include speaker series, international research, and working conferences. They are selected for support based on their crossdisciplinary and interdisciplinary focus.

This series provides an opportunity for UW humanities scholars to discuss their recently published books.

seed new collaborations between faculty and graduate students who share research interests.

The Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities Series recognizes scholars in the humanities and emphasizes the role of the humanities in liberal education. The series is named after Solomon Katz, who served for 53 years at the UW, as an instructor, professor, Chair of the Department of History, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Provost, and Vice President for Academic Affairs. All Katz Lectures are free and open to the public. 

encourage crossdisciplinary collaboration among graduate students through organized readings, screenings, dissertation working groups, and other activities.

are awarded for faculty, postdoctoral, and graduate research through both internal and external grants.  

are supported by small discretionary grants that facilitate opportunities for interdepartmental lectures, colloquia, and conferences at UW.

fund extended crossdisciplinary, collaborative projects that are often aligned with Simpson Center initiatives.

include the tri-annual Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities and the Joff Hanuaer Lectures in Western Civilization.

at the Simpson Center includes interdisciplinary graduate courses and the Certificate in Public Scholarship.

supports projects that promote collaboration between scholars and community partners in education, governmental, non-profit, and grassroots organizations.

stand at the leading edge of change by promoting collaborative, crossdisciplinary research and transformational scholarship.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy.

art

Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy.

Check here for a listing of scholarly blogs related to Simpson Center initiatives, programs, and projects.

Reading groups and microseminars with a number of UW faculty whose research interests dwell outside the usual purview of Asian American Studies.

NEH

war

law

In 2007, the Joff Hanauer Endowment for Excellence in Western Civilization was established through a gift from Seattle businessman and philanthropist Jerry Hanauer, in memory of his son. It supports two professorships and several graduate student fellowships in Western Civilization, in addition to a lecture series.

Space, Movement, and Translation

Space, Movement, and Translation brings together a diverse group of graduate students from different disciplines and backgrounds interested in novel ways of representing historical movement, space, and translation in scholarship.

Socially Engaged Art in Japan

The symposium Socially Engaged Art in Japan explores work that crosses the boundaries between art and social activism and how Japan’s experience can inform a global understanding of such work.

Rachel Arteaga

ArteagaRachel Arteaga holds an MA in English from Boston College and is completing her doctorate in English at the University of Washington, where she has taught courses in composition and American literature. Her dissertation, which she expects to defend in December 2015, focuses on feelings of faith—among them, hope, doubt, and joy—in American literature.

2014-15 Co-Sponsored Community Events

Each year the Simpson Center supports events in the greater Seattle community with small discretionary grants.Learn

2014-15 Co-Sponsored UW Events

Each year the Simpson Center co-sponsors dozens of interdepartmental speaker events and conferences with small discretionary grants. 

Postcolonial Animal Studies: Redefining What Lives Matter (Video)

María Elena García leads a research cluster reconsidering our relationships with non-human lives, following a conviction that violence toward any life is violence toward all.

Ethnographic Aesthetics: Image, Sound, Word

Birds flying above ocean

Ethnographic Aesthetics is a speaker series featuring innovators whose work in poetry, sound, and film expands the practice of ethnography through humanistic, sensory forms of knowing.

Mediating Difference: Sights and Sounds

Difference is a term that late twentieth and early twenty-first century scholars of race, gender, and sexuality have claimed and yet left largely un-theorized.

Performance Studies Research Group

The Performance Studies Research Group draws together scholars from various disciplines to discuss foundational and new work in the field of performance studies.

Histories and Futures of Publication

Histories and Futures of Publication is an interdisciplinary lecture and colloquium series in manuscript, print, and digital cultures.

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