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"Thank You" from the Simpson Center!

We are very excited to announce that, counting funds and pledges raised thus far, we are just $25,000 away from our goal of matching the NEH Challenge Grant in support of the Digital Humanities Commons! Thanks to all who have donated to this initiative, helping us move even closer toward our goal of $1,875,000!

Shu-mei Shih Visits the UW to Deliver Katz Lecture

Noted scholar Shu-mei Shih visits the UW in November to deliver a Katz Distinguished Lecture in the Humanities. Her talk is also the keynote address for the international conference New Geographies of Feminist Art: China, Asia, and the World.

Victoria Lawson to Deliver Katz Lecture

On Wednesday, November 7, UW Professor of Geography Victoria Lawson will present the first Katz Distinguished Lecture of the 2012-13 academic year.

In Partnership: A Course Re-envisioned with the Northwest African American Museum

Ralina Joseph -

Ralina Joseph (Communication) received a Certificate in Public Scholarship (CPS) course development grant from the Simpson Center this year, to explore the possibilities for further project-based collaboration between her Black Cultural Studies classes and the Northwest African American Museum (NAAM). Together with CPS graduate fellows Maurice Dolbery (Education) and Melanie Hernandez (English), and NAAM staff members Chieko Phillips, Leilani Lewis, and deputy director Brian Carter, she’ll be laying the foundations for a sustainable partnership between NAAM and the graduate and undergraduate sections of this course. She teaches the undergraduate class every Winter, and the graduate level course is taught in alternating years.

Fall Funding Round Application Deadline is November 14, 2012

The Simpson Center is currently accepting applications for Society of Scholars research fellowships, Collaboration Studio Grants, conferences and collaborative projects of all scales, as well as nominations for Katz lecturers and Center for the Study of the Pacific Northwest travel grants for the 2013-2014 academic year. The deadline is November 14, 2012.

Laying the Groundwork for the Digital Humanities Commons

Anticipated to begin in 2014, the Digital Humanities Commons—a summer fellowship program for faculty and graduate students at the UW—will support innovative and experimental research both inspired by new technologies and about these new methods of research and forms of communication. Where research in the humanities is often undertaken by a single scholar, the Commons will enable faculty and graduate students to collaborate with librarians, technologies, and designers to animate their scholarship with new visualization tools, digital media, and communications platforms.

New Geographies of Feminist Art: China, Asia, and the World

Through an examination of the role of women artists, the past and future of feminism, and the visual representation of gender and sexuality, Sonal Khullar (Art History) and Sasha Welland (Gender, Women, & Sexuality Studies) aim to reorient scholarly discussion of contemporary art towards nonwestern centers, from Mumbai and Shanghai to Tokyo and Jakarta. Together they have been organizing an international conference, New Geographies of Feminist Art: China, Asia, and the World. It takes place at the UW November 15-17, 2012. With support from the American Council of Learned Societies, the conference focuses on the transnational circulation of feminist aesthetics and politics.

Simpson Center Annual Newsletter Available Now!

The 2012-13 Simpson Center Annual Newsletter is hot off the press! Have you seen it yet? If not, read it online and/or download a PDF copy! Print versions are also available at the Simpson Center, so stop by if you'd like one!

Fall 2012 Conference Line-Up

The Simpson Center is kicking off the 2012-13 year with a number of conferences. From intimate working research clusters to large, international gatherings, we will be sponsoring the following events this fall. Visit the webpages linked below for more information on each, and mark your calendars accordingly!

B/ordering Violence: Boundaries, Gender, Indigeneity in the Americas

As Gloria Anzaldúa’s description of the Mexico-US border in her 1987 book Borderlands/La Frontera attests, borders can be “una herida abierta (an open wound) where the third world grates against the first and bleeds.” Borderlands throughout the Americas and beyond constitute sites of conflict, friction and—more hopefully—solidarity. Although borderlands are not unique sites of violence, they are critical fault lines along which the legacy of colonialism and the impact of globalization have become especially severe.

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provide UW faculty groups with leave to catalyze, deepen, or reconfigure cross-disciplinary research and to work toward publication.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

include speaker series, international research, and working conferences. They are selected for support based on their crossdisciplinary and interdisciplinary focus.

This series provides an opportunity for UW humanities scholars to discuss their recently published books.

seed new collaborations between faculty and graduate students who share research interests.

The Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities Series recognizes scholars in the humanities and emphasizes the role of the humanities in liberal education. The series is named after Solomon Katz, who served for 53 years at the UW, as an instructor, professor, Chair of the Department of History, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Provost, and Vice President for Academic Affairs. All Katz Lectures are free and open to the public. 

encourage crossdisciplinary collaboration among graduate students through organized readings, screenings, dissertation working groups, and other activities.

are awarded for faculty, postdoctoral, and graduate research through both internal and external grants.  

are supported by small discretionary grants that facilitate opportunities for interdepartmental lectures, colloquia, and conferences at UW.

fund extended crossdisciplinary, collaborative projects that are often aligned with Simpson Center initiatives.

include the tri-annual Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities and the Joff Hanuaer Lectures in Western Civilization.

at the Simpson Center includes interdisciplinary graduate courses and the Certificate in Public Scholarship.

supports projects that promote collaboration between scholars and community partners in education, governmental, non-profit, and grassroots organizations.

stand at the leading edge of change by promoting collaborative, crossdisciplinary research and transformational scholarship.

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Check here for a listing of scholarly blogs related to Simpson Center initiatives, programs, and projects.

Reading groups and microseminars with a number of UW faculty whose research interests dwell outside the usual purview of Asian American Studies.

In 2007, the Joff Hanauer Endowment for Excellence in Western Civilization was established through a gift from Seattle businessman and philanthropist Jerry Hanauer, in memory of his son. It supports two professorships and several graduate student fellowships in Western Civilization, in addition to a lecture series.

GIG

provide UW faculty groups with leave to catalyze, deepen, or reconfigure cross-disciplinary research and to work toward publication.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

include speaker series, international research, and working conferences. They are selected for support based on their crossdisciplinary and interdisciplinary focus.

This series provides an opportunity for UW humanities scholars to discuss their recently published books.

seed new collaborations between faculty and graduate students who share research interests.

The Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities Series recognizes scholars in the humanities and emphasizes the role of the humanities in liberal education. The series is named after Solomon Katz, who served for 53 years at the UW, as an instructor, professor, Chair of the Department of History, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Provost, and Vice President for Academic Affairs. All Katz Lectures are free and open to the public. 

encourage crossdisciplinary collaboration among graduate students through organized readings, screenings, dissertation working groups, and other activities.

are awarded for faculty, postdoctoral, and graduate research through both internal and external grants.  

are supported by small discretionary grants that facilitate opportunities for interdepartmental lectures, colloquia, and conferences at UW.

fund extended crossdisciplinary, collaborative projects that are often aligned with Simpson Center initiatives.

include the tri-annual Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities and the Joff Hanuaer Lectures in Western Civilization.

at the Simpson Center includes interdisciplinary graduate courses and the Certificate in Public Scholarship.

supports projects that promote collaboration between scholars and community partners in education, governmental, non-profit, and grassroots organizations.

stand at the leading edge of change by promoting collaborative, crossdisciplinary research and transformational scholarship.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy.

art

Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy.

Check here for a listing of scholarly blogs related to Simpson Center initiatives, programs, and projects.

Reading groups and microseminars with a number of UW faculty whose research interests dwell outside the usual purview of Asian American Studies.

NEH

war

law

In 2007, the Joff Hanauer Endowment for Excellence in Western Civilization was established through a gift from Seattle businessman and philanthropist Jerry Hanauer, in memory of his son. It supports two professorships and several graduate student fellowships in Western Civilization, in addition to a lecture series.

2013-14 Co-Sponsored Events

Every year the Simpson Center co-sponsors dozens of interdepartmental speaker events and conferences with small discretionary grants. Co-sponsorships are limited to $500 and do not require Executive Board review. The Simpson Center also co-sponsors events that feature UW faculty and graduate students as speakers or facilitators in community venues. Learn more about how to apply.

The following list of recent events provides an overview of the diverse events supported by co-sponsorship funds.

Co-Sponsored Events

Co-Sponsored UW Events

Every year the Simpson Center co-sponsors dozens of interdepartmental speaker events, conferences, and other scholarly events at UW with small discretionary grants. Co-sponsorships are limited to $500 and do not require Executive Board review.

The Cascadia Seminar: Ethnographic Adventures in Medical Anthropology

In conjunction with the 2015 Cascadia Seminar in Medical Anthropology, Mette Nordahl Svendsen will give a public lecture about her research project, "A Life Worth Living: Negotiating Life Worthiness in Human and Animal." Svendsen is Associate Professor in the Medical Science & Technology Studies program, in the School of Public Health at the University of Copenhagen (Denmark). For this project, funded by a prestigious Sapere Aude grant from the Danish Council for Independent Research, Svendsen directs a small team of researchers exploring--through ethnographic research in laboratories, care homes, and clinics--how the "life worthiness" is enacted, conceptualized, and contested in practice, for experimental research animals and the fragile humans (premature infants and dementia sufferers) for whom these animals serve as models.

Call for Nominations: Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities

Beginning Oct. 15, the Simpson Center will accept nominations of UW faculty and visiting scholars for the Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities series for the 2015-16 academic year. The deadline is Nov. 14. 2014.

Fall Funding Round Application Deadline: Nov. 14, 2014

This year’s submission deadline for the Simpson Center’s Fall Funding Round is Nov. 14. Funding covers the term July 2015-June 2016.

ArtTalk—Conversations with Northwest Native Art

ArtTalk—Conversations with Northwest Native Art is organized by the Bill Holm Center for the Study of Northwest Coast Art and will bring together leading scholars and Native American/First Nations artists to present and discuss current trends and recent research on the distinctive art traditions of our region, both to examine the last fifty years of Northwest Coast art, as marked by the 50th anniversary volume of Bill Holm’s Northwest Coast Indian Art: An Analysis of Form, and to look forward to the next fifty years.

The Roles of Fiction in Early Modern Philosophy

One central trope of early modern philosophy and natural science was the rejection of fictions, like so-called "feigned hypotheses," and the focus on empirically observed phenomena. Yet, even as philosophers rejected the abstract notion of a fiction, they still relied upon fictions and narrative models in fundamental ways. Participants in this conference will examine this tension and look at both particular philosophers--such as Descartes, Spinoza, Hobbes, Hume, and Kant--and general themes, including the conception of fiction itself, the use of fiction in producing metaphysical knowledge, the use of fictions as examples in moral theory, and scientific models as kinds of fictions. We also intend to consider how philosophy was used in fiction, both in the period itself and then later, as in the case of the novelist George Eliot.

Scale and Value: New and Digital Approaches to Literary History

This conference and the ensuing publication in Modern Language Quarterly will present work by leading scholars whose use of digital texts or quantitative methods is clarifying the relationship between literary scale and value and yielding new insights into the literary history of the last three centuries.

Malia Trick

As the Simpson Center’s Administrator, Malia Trick oversees general operations, budget management, and human resources.

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