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Reiko Yamanaka Visits Simpson Center as Visiting Scholar

Reiko YamanakaReiko Yamanaka, Professor and Director of the Noh Theatre Research Institute of Hosei University in Tokyo, joins the Simpson Center as a visiting scholar in April and May 2017. Reiko is an accomplished scholar of noh drama and performance and the recipient of several grants from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.

Bachman Creates Suzzallo Library Exhibit on ‘Bollywood and Bolsheviks’

Doctoral student Jessica Bachman (History) has created a new exhibit based on her work as a Mellon Summer Fellow for Public Projects in the Humanities.

Global Indigeneities Institute Leads to NSF and Post-Doc Fellowships

Two participants in last year’s Summer Institute in Global Indigeneities (SIGI) have landed prestigious fellowships that they credit, in part, to the inaugural institute at the UW.

Exploring Global Health ‘Partnerships’

Iruka Okeke speaks at lectern

A uniquely collaborative research team unpacks a widely used but rarely scrutinized term in global health.

Khullar Wins Asian Studies Award for Book on Indian Art and Identity

Sonal Khullar (Art History) was recently awarded the Cohn Prize for a first book in South Asian Studies for her book Worldly Affiliations: Artistic Practice, National Identity, and Modernism in India, 1930-1990.

The Moral Failure of Crowdfunding Health Care

GoFundMe.com homepage image of two women with text "Go fund a family"

The rise of crowdfunding on sites like GoFundMe reflects—and potentially worsens—inequities already at play in US health care, according to new research.

Lobbying for the Humanities in Washington, DC

Senator Patty Murray with visitors in Senate corridor

The Simpson Center’s Andy Nestingen and Jon Hiskes spoke with Washington state’s Congressional offices about the life-changing power of humanities and language funding.

Lorraine Daston on Algorithms Before Computers - April 19

Lorraine Daston

Celebrated historian of science Lorraine Daston delivers a Katz Distinguished Lecture at 7 pm, Wednesday, April 19 in Kane Hall 210. The event is free and open to the public.

Sunardi Wins Award for Book on Gender and Tradition in Javanese Dance

SunardiChristina Sunardi (Ethnomusicology, School of Music) recently received the Philip Brett Award from the American Musicological Society for her book Stunning Males and Powerful Females: Gender and Tradition in East Javanese Dance (University of Illinois Press, 2016). 

Erzen and Vaught Books Expose New Trends in American Prison System

VaughtTwo scholars with connections to the Simpson Center have new books about overlooked trends within the contemporary American prison system.

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provide UW faculty groups with leave to catalyze, deepen, or reconfigure cross-disciplinary research and to work toward publication.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

include speaker series, international research, and working conferences. They are selected for support based on their crossdisciplinary and interdisciplinary focus.

This series provides an opportunity for UW humanities scholars to discuss their recently published books.

seed new collaborations between faculty and graduate students who share research interests.

The Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities Series recognizes scholars in the humanities and emphasizes the role of the humanities in liberal education. The series is named after Solomon Katz, who served for 53 years at the UW, as an instructor, professor, Chair of the Department of History, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Provost, and Vice President for Academic Affairs. All Katz Lectures are free and open to the public. 

(formerly Graduate Interest Groups) encourage crossdisciplinary collaboration among graduate students through organized readings, screenings, dissertation working groups, and other activities.

are awarded for faculty, postdoctoral, and graduate research through both internal and external grants.  

are supported by small discretionary grants that facilitate opportunities for interdepartmental lectures, colloquia, and conferences at UW.

fund extended crossdisciplinary, collaborative projects that are often aligned with Simpson Center initiatives.

include the tri-annual Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities and the Joff Hanuaer Lectures in Western Civilization.

at the Simpson Center includes interdisciplinary graduate courses and the Certificate in Public Scholarship.

supports projects that promote collaboration between scholars and community partners in education, governmental, non-profit, and grassroots organizations.

stand at the leading edge of change by promoting collaborative, crossdisciplinary research and transformational scholarship.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy.

Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy.

Check here for a listing of scholarly blogs related to Simpson Center initiatives, programs, and projects.

Reading groups and microseminars with a number of UW faculty whose research interests dwell outside the usual purview of Asian American Studies.

In 2007, the Joff Hanauer Endowment for Excellence in Western Civilization was established through a gift from Seattle businessman and philanthropist Jerry Hanauer, in memory of his son. It supports two professorships and several graduate student fellowships in Western Civilization, in addition to a lecture series.

GIG

This initiative, launched in 2016, contributes to nationwide conversations about developing new approaches to doctoral education.

provide UW faculty groups with leave to catalyze, deepen, or reconfigure cross-disciplinary research and to work toward publication.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

include speaker series, international research, and working conferences. They are selected for support based on their crossdisciplinary and interdisciplinary focus.

This series provides an opportunity for UW humanities scholars to discuss their recently published books.

seed new collaborations between faculty and graduate students who share research interests.

The Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities Series recognizes scholars in the humanities and emphasizes the role of the humanities in liberal education. The series is named after Solomon Katz, who served for 53 years at the UW, as an instructor, professor, Chair of the Department of History, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Provost, and Vice President for Academic Affairs. All Katz Lectures are free and open to the public. 

(formerly Graduate Interest Groups) encourage crossdisciplinary collaboration among graduate students through organized readings, screenings, dissertation working groups, and other activities.

are awarded for faculty, postdoctoral, and graduate research through both internal and external grants.  

are supported by small discretionary grants that facilitate opportunities for interdepartmental lectures, colloquia, and conferences at UW.

fund extended crossdisciplinary, collaborative projects that are often aligned with Simpson Center initiatives.

include the tri-annual Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities and the Joff Hanuaer Lectures in Western Civilization.

at the Simpson Center includes interdisciplinary graduate courses and the Certificate in Public Scholarship.

supports projects that promote collaboration between scholars and community partners in education, governmental, non-profit, and grassroots organizations.

stand at the leading edge of change by promoting collaborative, crossdisciplinary research and transformational scholarship.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy.

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Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy.

Check here for a listing of scholarly blogs related to Simpson Center initiatives, programs, and projects.

Reading groups and microseminars with a number of UW faculty whose research interests dwell outside the usual purview of Asian American Studies.

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war

law

In 2007, the Joff Hanauer Endowment for Excellence in Western Civilization was established through a gift from Seattle businessman and philanthropist Jerry Hanauer, in memory of his son. It supports two professorships and several graduate student fellowships in Western Civilization, in addition to a lecture series.

PhD

This initiative, launched in 2016, contributes to nationwide conversations about developing new approaches to doctoral education.

Annie Dwyer

Annie Dwyer is Assistant Program Director for Reimagining the Humanities PhD and Reaching New Publics. She earned a PhD in English from the University of Washington in 2014. In addition to teaching composition and literature at the UW, she has taught a range of interdisciplinary courses in the Comparative History of Ideas program, where she continues to teach part-time as a Lecturer. During her graduate studies, she completed the UW’s graduate Certificate in Public Scholarship.

Monica Cohn

As the Simpson Center’s Administrator, Monica Cohn oversees general operations and manages budgets and human resources. She works with faculty members leading funded projects on budget matters and collaborates with staff on strategic planning and management of funding cycles.

Capitalism and Comparative Racialization

Female African American leaning on a stick placed in water. Hanging tapestries behind her.

This year-long program of lectures and discussion groups brings scholars together from across the University of Washington to explore the relationship between race and capitalism in the modern world.

Modernist Studies

Lithograph of soldiers marching

The Modernist Studies graduate research cluster brings together scholars from various departments and the community to discuss literary, visual, and historical texts related to the late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century.

2016-17 Co-Sponsored Events

Each year the Simpson Center co-sponsors many interdepartmental speaker events and conferences with small discretionary grants. 

Interdisciplinary and Transnational Feminist Approaches to 'the Private'

Collaged image of a head, with images of eyeballs and abstract drawings

Together we are interested in exploring a feminist, cross-disciplinary study of the concept of privacy through the lens of intersectionality.

Genomics Salon

Scroll, inkpot, and quill

The Genomics Salon graduate research cluster provides an informal forum for discussing subjects of general intellectual interest related to genomics and, more broadly, modern biology, in the spirit of Enlightenment-era French salons.

Gender and Sexuality Studies

Drawing of five people with exchangeable body parts

We are a diverse group with a common goal: to create and maintain a supportive intellectual community that encourages a variety of rigorous work related to the topics of gender and sexuality.

Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century

Drawings of Victorian fashion trends throughout the 1800s

The Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century graduate research cluster brings together graduate students from English, Art History, Comparative Literature, Cinema & Media, French & Italian Studies, and other departments who research various aspects of the global middle-modernity period.

Disability Studies

Black and white photo from a protest. Protesters in wheelchairs, holding signs saying "We shall overcome" and "Access is a civil right"

Disability Studies is a growing field that approaches disability from a social justice perspective. It pushes back against a dominant narrative that disability is a condition to be cured or minimized through medical, technical, or other intervention.

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