News tagged with 'digital humanities'

The Unconference Experience: InfoCamp and THATCamp

Unconferences are quickly becoming an alternative to traditional academic conferences. The model is especially appealing because it actively promotes collaboration and discussion acrossdisciplines, and participants are engaged at every level. This fall, Dana Bublitz, a graduate staff assistant at the Simpson Center, had the opportunity to attend two unconferences: InfoCamp (Information Camp), held here at the UW, and THATCamp (The Humanities and Technology Camp): Digital Humanities and Libraries in Denver, Colorado.

"Thank You" from the Simpson Center!

We are very excited to announce that, counting funds and pledges raised thus far, we are just $25,000 away from our goal of matching the NEH Challenge Grant in support of the Digital Humanities Commons! Thanks to all who have donated to this initiative, helping us move even closer toward our goal of $1,875,000!

Laying the Groundwork for the Digital Humanities Commons

Anticipated to begin in 2014, the Digital Humanities Commons—a summer fellowship program for faculty and graduate students at the UW—will support innovative and experimental research both inspired by new technologies and about these new methods of research and forms of communication. Where research in the humanities is often undertaken by a single scholar, the Commons will enable faculty and graduate students to collaborate with librarians, technologies, and designers to animate their scholarship with new visualization tools, digital media, and communications platforms.

Technology, Scholarship, and the Humanities: A Conversation with Jentery Sayers

Jentery Sayers

Integrating computer technologies with humanities research. Utilizing computational tools to retrieve, analyze, and visually represent data. Exploring multimodal ways of teaching, disseminating, and publishing scholarship. Curating online collections. The field of digital humanities is all of this, and more.


Doctoral Student Ryan Burns Selected to Present on Digital Scholarship at UW HuskyFest 2012

Ryan Burns

Ryan Burns, doctoral student in Geography and Simpson Center Public Scholarship Fellow, has been invited to share his research at HuskyFest 2012, as part of the College of Arts & Sciences Dean’s Showcase. The UW is hosting HuskyFest—a three-day campus-wide festival showcasing the university’s dynamic scholarship and activities—to celebrate its 150th anniversary. HuskyFest, which takes place April 19-21, will feature a variety of activities, including live music, food, dance, lectures, demonstrations, interactive booths, open houses, art exhibits, tours, giveaways and much more.

Graduate Interest Group Spotlight: Keywords for Video Games Studies

Organizers Ed Chang and Theresa Horstman at a recent Keywords workshop.

Avatar. Gamer. Power. Control. Time. Altplay. Fandom. Hack. Customization. These gaming terms may be part of everyday language to those who play video games, but for the members of Keywords for Video Games Studies, a graduate student interest group funded by the Simpson Center, they are much more. When acknowledged as keywords, they become sites of critical engagement and scholarly dialogue.

Technology, Social Justice, and the Humanities Intersect at THATCamp PNW Unconference

What are the relationships between technological literacy and social change?

Participants in this year’s THATCamp PNW came together on Saturday, November 12, at the University of Washington-Bothell’s Center for Serious Play to explore this question.

Sharon Daniel on Public Records / Secret Publics

Sharon Daniel (right) with Kathleen Woodward and Miriam Bartha.

Artist, activist, and scholar Sharon Daniel recently visited the University of Washington to present from her current series of new media documentaries.

Her visit helped coalesce campus discussions and program building around media arts and activism, digital humanities, and public scholarship.

UW Graduate Students at “Serious Play”

Graduate students Theresa Horstman and Edmond Chang

Two UW scholars doing research in video games studies were recently sponsored by the Simpson Center for the Humanities to attend this year’s Serious Play Conference. Edmond Chang and Theresa Horstman, graduate students in English and Education, respectively, took part in the conference, which was held at the DigiPen Institute of Technology in Redmond, Washington.

Simpson Center Says “Thank You!” to UW Faculty and Staff Donors

The Simpson Center would like to extend a big “thank you!” to all UW faculty and staff who have donated toward the Digital Humanities Commons since Spring 2011.


Society for Textual Scholarship 2014 Conference: Textual Scholarship Across the Disciplines

The 18th annual international conference of the Society for Textual Scholarship will be held March 20-22, 2014, at the University of Washington. The conference welcomes scholars whose work on the materiality of books and media intersects with big-picture debates about the place of the humanities, innovation in graduate education, and public scholarship. 

Teaching with Technology: Graduate Interest Group Invites Student Instructors to Share Technology-Based Pedagogical Practices

How are UW graduate teaching assistants across the humanities and social sciences using technology in their classrooms? This year, English graduate students Rachel Arteaga and A.J. Burgin have organized Teaching with Technology, a Graduate Interest Group (GIG) at the Simpson Center, so that graduate instructors can share ideas with one another. The group provides a platform for both experienced and less-experienced teachers to discuss digital tools (for example, the use of mobile devices, social media, and blogging) in various classroom settings.

Digital Humanities Resources: On-Campus and Online

Curious to learn more about digital humanities scholarship? This list of digital humanities resources, created by the Simpson Center’s web tech Dana Bublitz, may be useful to anyone currently involved in or considering getting started with digital humanities scholarship at the UW. It includes information about both on-campus and online resources.

Histories and Futures of the Book: Exploring Reading and Writing in the Digital Age

Histories and Futures of the Book is a 2013-14 interdisciplinary lecture series in manuscript, print, and digital culture taking place in conjunction with the annual meeting of the Society for Textual Scholarship (STS), March 20-22, 2014, at the UW. Organized by Jeffrey Knight (English) and Geoffrey Turnovsky (French & Italian), the lecture series and conference welcomes distinguished scholars from across the country whose work on the materiality of books and media intersects with big-picture debates about the place of the humanities, innovation in graduate education, and public scholarship.

Women Who Rock

Since 2011, Women Who Rock (WWR) has brought together scholars/archivists, musicians, media-makers, performers, artists, and activists to explore the role of women and popular music in the creation of cultural scenes and social justice movements in the Americas and beyond. The project encompasses several interwoven components: project-based coursework at the graduate and undergraduate levels; an annual participant-driven conference and film festival; and an oral history archive hosted by the University of Washington Libraries Digital Initiatives Program that ties the various components together. The archive features oral histories with Medusa, Alice Bag, Nobuko Miyamoto, and many others.

New Summer Digital Humanities Commons Research Fellowships at the Simpson Center

The Simpson Center’s Summer Digital Humanities Commons Fellowships support scholars pursuing research projects that use digital technologies in innovative and intensive ways and/or explore the historical, social, aesthetic, and cross-cultural implications of digital cultures. Applications will be accepted starting Oct. 15 for the Summer 2014 fellowship term. The deadline is Nov. 15.

Announcing the UW's 2013-14 HASTAC Scholars

The Simpson Center has nominated ten graduate students to serve as HASTAC Scholars for the 2013-14 academic year, based on their advancement of digital scholarship at the UW.

Affect & Audience in the Digital Age

Affect & Audience in the Digital Age is a symposium and performance event exploring the aesthetics of digital meditation in contemporary poetry. While poets have long been expected to connect with readers through carefully constructed emotional appeals, much poetic work is now written through impersonal digital methodologies such as crowd sourcing and data mining. Yet digitally mediated poetry can still have a particular affective density: even appropriated text from the Internet can convey the “powerful feelings” that Wordsworth described as the ideal for poetry.

Histories and Futures of the Book

Histories and Futures of the Book is an interdisciplinary lecture series in manuscript, print, and digital culture organized by the Textual Studies Program in conjunction with the annual meeting of the


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