News tagged with 'digital humanities'

Histories and Futures of the Book: Exploring Reading and Writing in the Digital Age

Histories and Futures of the Book is a 2013-14 interdisciplinary lecture series in manuscript, print, and digital culture taking place in conjunction with the annual meeting of the Society for Textual Scholarship (STS), March 20-22, 2014, at the UW. Organized by Jeffrey Knight (English) and Geoffrey Turnovsky (French & Italian), the lecture series and conference welcomes distinguished scholars from across the country whose work on the materiality of books and media intersects with big-picture debates about the place of the humanities, innovation in graduate education, and public scholarship.

New Summer Digital Humanities Commons Research Fellowships at the Simpson Center

The Simpson Center’s Summer Digital Humanities Commons Fellowships support scholars pursuing research projects that use digital technologies in innovative and intensive ways and/or explore the historical, social, aesthetic, and cross-cultural implications of digital cultures. Applications will be accepted starting Oct. 15 for the Summer 2014 fellowship term. The deadline is Nov. 15.

Announcing the UW's 2013-14 HASTAC Scholars

The Simpson Center has nominated ten graduate students to serve as HASTAC Scholars for the 2013-14 academic year, based on their advancement of digital scholarship at the UW.

Affect & Audience in the Digital Age

Affect & Audience in the Digital Age is a symposium and performance event exploring the aesthetics of digital meditation in contemporary poetry. While poets have long been expected to connect with readers through carefully constructed emotional appeals, much poetic work is now written through impersonal digital methodologies such as crowd sourcing and data mining. Yet digitally mediated poetry can still have a particular affective density: even appropriated text from the Internet can convey the “powerful feelings” that Wordsworth described as the ideal for poetry.

Creating Value and Impact in the Digital Age Through Translational Humanities: A Case Statement by Abby Smith Rumsey

The Simpson Center is delighted to circulate the following case statement, written by Abby Smith Rumsey, director of the Scholarly Communication Institute (SCI). In it, she explores the value of the humanities in the digital era by emphasizing the importance of translational work in which humanities scholars engage with more diverse publics. Reaching out to publics beyond academic borders is one of the key missions of the Simpson Center.

Demystifying the Digital Humanities at UW

The emerging field of digital humanities (DH) has been attracting more and more attention on campus in recent years. But what exactly are the “digital humanities”? And how exactly does one going about becoming a “digital humanist”? To answer some of these questions, English graduate students Paige Morgan and Sarah Kremen-Hicks have created a year-long workshop series, “Demystifying the Digital Humanities.”

Rock the Archive: Women Who Rock’s 2013 (un)Conference & Film Festival Launches Digital Oral History Archive

The guiding impulse of the humanities involves the creation and interpretation of archives. Historically “the archive” connotes repositories of officially-sanctioned value—Shakespeare’s folios, the Eisenhower papers, government-sponsored entities such as the National Archives & Records Administration. The Women Who Rock research project, now in its third year of funding by the Simpson Center, wants to rock that idea, revising popular and academic accounts by producing alternative, community-driven archives in a D.I.Y. (“do-it-yourself”) spirit.

Simpson Center Meets Digital Humanities Fundraising Goal!

The Simpson Center has met its goal of matching the National Endowment for the Humanities Challenge Grant in support of the digital humanities! Thanks to our donors, we have raised $1.875 million since fundraising began in 2009!

Cathy N. Davidson Delivers Winter 2013 Katz Lecture on Future of Higher Education, Digital Learning

In one generation, we have undergone tremendous changes in how we communicate, socialize, learn, do business, and engage in civic life. We rely on non-experts for information on sites such as Wikipedia and take the advice of strangers on everything from restaurant recommendations to health care. Interactive digital technologies have changed how we learn in everyday life far faster than they’ve changed the structures, motives, and metrics of our educational systems. Until now. According to Winter 2013 Katz Lecturer Cathy N. Davidson, we are on the threshold of a monumental transformation in higher education, one aimed at the needs and expectations of the next generation of resilient, connected, self-paced, peer-inspired, creative, multidisciplinary, and multicultural global learners.

A Sneak Peek at the Simpson Center’s Collaboration Space!

Construction is currently under way to transform three small offices into a 375 square-foot flexible, multidisciplinary collaboration space at the Simpson Center! The new space will be a hybrid: part digital scholarship lab and part space for scholarly discussion. Flexibility is the key concept behind this space. By selecting furniture and equipment that is easily stored, stacked, folded, and moved, this space will be a dynamic meeting space for a variety of small engagements and activities.


Histories and Futures of Publication

Histories and Futures of Publication is an interdisciplinary lecture and colloquium series in manuscript, print, and digital cultures.

How the Age of Amazon Is Reshaping Literary History

Amazon's dominance of the book-publishing industry and relentless focus on customer service may herald a new era in American fiction.

We Wandered as a Cloud: Collaborative Poetry for a Digital Age

The research cluster Affect & Audience in the Digital Age brings a distinctly collaborative approach for rethinking poetry in the digital era.

Teaching with Technology

The Teaching with Technology graduate interest group brings together teaching assistants to explore how new technologies are changing the craft of teaching.

Scale and Value: New and Digital Approaches to Literary History

This conference and the ensuing publication in Modern Language Quarterly will present work by leading scholars whose use of digital texts or quantitative methods is clarifying the relationship between literary scale and value and yielding new insights into the literary history of the last three centuries.

Announcing the 2014-15 HASTAC Scholars

The Simpson Center has nominated ten graduate students to serve as HASTAC Scholars for the 2014-15 academic year, based on their advancement of digital scholarship at the UW.

Teaching with Technology

Teaching with Technology aims to bring together graduate teaching assistants from various departments to discuss and develop technology-based teaching tools and lessons. This group provides a platform for instructors with varying experience levels to collaborate on and workshop a pedagogical toolkit that brings technology such as mobile devices, screen-capture software, social media, and blogging into a variety of classroom settings.

Lake Union Laboratory: Curating Collaborative Urban Research in the Digital Realm

This collaboration studio grant supports a cross-disciplinary team exploring the potential for digital platforms and tools to generate new transdisciplinary knowledges in and of urbanism and cities.

Histories and Futures of Reading

Histories and Futures of Reading is an interdisciplinary lecture and colloquium series in manuscript, print, and digital cultures organized in conjunction with the Textual Studies Program's three-year plan for curricular revision

Affect & Audience in the Digital Age

Affect & Audience in the Digital Age explores emergent modes of creative public scholarship.