Programs tagged with 'any keyword'

Elective Courses

Here are courses that CPS Fellows have taken to satisfy this requirement.  Please also refer to HUM 595

UW Links

Links to Resources from the University of Washington

Travel Funding

As part of its sponsorship of the Certificate, the Simpson Center makes available some limited conference travel funding for CPS fellows.

People

The Certificate in Public Scholarship comprises an extended learning community of graduate student fellows, faculty and staff advisors, and their c

Curriculum

The Certificate in Public Scholarship curriculum is portfolio- and project-based, designed to support fellows in developing rich archives that evid

National Context

The Certificate in Public Scholarship is part of a larger movement to build mutually-beneficial partnerships among campuses and communities, and to

Mission

The graduate Certificate in Public Scholarship (CPS) at the University of Washington (UW) fosters equitable and reciprocal forms of public engageme

Cathy Davidson

Now You See It: Why the Future of Higher Education Demands a Paradigm Shift
Thursday, February 21, 2013 - 7:00pm
Kane Hall, Room 210

Cathy Davidson explores the impact of digital media on learning, and how major institutions that adhere to organizational and learning models inherited from the early 20th century can be reshaped.

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provide UW faculty groups with leave to catalyze, deepen, or reconfigure cross-disciplinary research and to work toward publication.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

include speaker series, international research, and working conferences. They are selected for support based on their crossdisciplinary and interdisciplinary focus.

This series provides an opportunity for UW humanities scholars to discuss their recently published books.

seed new collaborations between faculty and graduate students who share research interests.

The Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities Series recognizes scholars in the humanities and emphasizes the role of the humanities in liberal education. The series is named after Solomon Katz, who served for 53 years at the UW, as an instructor, professor, Chair of the Department of History, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Provost, and Vice President for Academic Affairs. All Katz Lectures are free and open to the public.

You can now listen to full recordings of select Katz Lectures on our Podcasts page over in our redesigned Media + Publications section!

 

encourage crossdisciplinary collaboration among graduate students through organized readings, screenings, dissertation working groups, and other activities.

are awarded for faculty, postdoctoral, and graduate research through both internal and external grants.  

are supported by small discretionary grants that facilitate opportunities for interdepartmental lectures, colloquia, and conferences at UW.

fund extended crossdisciplinary, collaborative projects that are often aligned with Simpson Center initiatives.

include the tri-annual Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities and the Joff Hanuaer Lectures in Western Civilization.

at the Simpson Center includes interdisciplinary graduate courses and the Certificate in Public Scholarship.

supports projects that promote collaboration between scholars and community partners in education, governmental, non-profit, and grassroots organizations.

stand at the leading edge of change by promoting collaborative, crossdisciplinary research and transformational scholarship.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy.

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Check here for a listing of scholarly blogs related to Simpson Center initiatives, programs, and projects.

Reading groups and microseminars with a number of UW faculty whose research interests dwell outside the usual purview of Asian American Studies.

In 2007, the Joff Hanauer Endowment for Excellence in Western Civilization was established through a gift from Seattle businessman and philanthropist Jerry Hanauer, in memory of his son. It supports two professorships and several graduate student fellowships in Western Civilization, in addition to a lecture series.

GIG

provide UW faculty groups with leave to catalyze, deepen, or reconfigure cross-disciplinary research and to work toward publication.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

include speaker series, international research, and working conferences. They are selected for support based on their crossdisciplinary and interdisciplinary focus.

This series provides an opportunity for UW humanities scholars to discuss their recently published books.

seed new collaborations between faculty and graduate students who share research interests.

The Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities Series recognizes scholars in the humanities and emphasizes the role of the humanities in liberal education. The series is named after Solomon Katz, who served for 53 years at the UW, as an instructor, professor, Chair of the Department of History, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Provost, and Vice President for Academic Affairs. All Katz Lectures are free and open to the public.

You can now listen to full recordings of select Katz Lectures on our Podcasts page over in our redesigned Media + Publications section!

 

encourage crossdisciplinary collaboration among graduate students through organized readings, screenings, dissertation working groups, and other activities.

are awarded for faculty, postdoctoral, and graduate research through both internal and external grants.  

are supported by small discretionary grants that facilitate opportunities for interdepartmental lectures, colloquia, and conferences at UW.

fund extended crossdisciplinary, collaborative projects that are often aligned with Simpson Center initiatives.

include the tri-annual Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities and the Joff Hanuaer Lectures in Western Civilization.

at the Simpson Center includes interdisciplinary graduate courses and the Certificate in Public Scholarship.

supports projects that promote collaboration between scholars and community partners in education, governmental, non-profit, and grassroots organizations.

stand at the leading edge of change by promoting collaborative, crossdisciplinary research and transformational scholarship.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy.

art

Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy.

Check here for a listing of scholarly blogs related to Simpson Center initiatives, programs, and projects.

Reading groups and microseminars with a number of UW faculty whose research interests dwell outside the usual purview of Asian American Studies.

NEH

war

law

In 2007, the Joff Hanauer Endowment for Excellence in Western Civilization was established through a gift from Seattle businessman and philanthropist Jerry Hanauer, in memory of his son. It supports two professorships and several graduate student fellowships in Western Civilization, in addition to a lecture series.

Call for Nominations: Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities

Beginning Oct. 15, the Simpson Center will accept nominations of UW faculty and visiting scholars for the Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities series for the 2015-16 academic year. The deadline is Nov. 14. 2014.

Fall Funding Round Application Deadline: Nov. 14, 2014

This year’s submission deadline for the Simpson Center’s Fall Funding Round is Nov. 14. Funding covers the term July 2015-June 2016.

ArtTalk—Conversations with Northwest Native Art

ArtTalk—Conversations with Northwest Native Art is organized by the Bill Holm Center for the Study of Northwest Coast Art and will bring together leading scholars and Native American/First Nations artists to present and discuss current trends and recent research on the distinctive art traditions of our region, both to examine the last fifty years of Northwest Coast art, as marked by the 50th anniversary volume of Bill Holm’s Northwest Coast Indian Art: An Analysis of Form, and to look forward to the next fifty years.

The Roles of Fiction in Early Modern Philosophy

One central trope of early modern philosophy and natural science was the rejection of fictions, like so-called "feigned hypotheses," and the focus on empirically observed phenomena. Yet, even as philosophers rejected the abstract notion of a fiction, they still relied upon fictions and narrative models in fundamental ways. Participants in this conference will examine this tension and look at both particular philosophers--such as Descartes, Spinoza, Hobbes, Hume, and Kant--and general themes, including the conception of fiction itself, the use of fiction in producing metaphysical knowledge, the use of fictions as examples in moral theory, and scientific models as kinds of fictions. We also intend to consider how philosophy was used in fiction, both in the period itself and then later, as in the case of the novelist George Eliot.

Scale and Value: New and Digital Approaches to Literary History

This conference and the ensuing publication in Modern Language Quarterly will present work by leading scholars whose use of digital texts or quantitative methods is clarifying the relationship between literary scale and value and yielding new insights into the literary history of the last three centuries.

Malia Trick

As the Simpson Center Administrative Coordinator, Malia Trick manages the rooms, offices, and spaces under the jurisdiction of the Center and is the point person for all technology-related issues. She is the first point of contact for reservations and Center inquiries, and provides general clerical, fiscal, and operational support for Simpson Center staff.

Director’s Welcome

Welcome, all, to the new academic year!

UW Professor Thomas Lockwood Delivers Fall 2014 Katz Lecture

We hope you will join us on Tuesday, October 28, for the first Katz Distinguished Lecture in the Humanities of the 2014-15 year. Noted UW scholar Thomas Lockwood (English) will examine the work of Jonathan Swift. His lecture, titled “Is Eating Babies Really So Terrible? The Dark Genius of Jonathan Swift,” takes place at 7:00 pm in Kane 210.

Fall 2014

HUM 595A

Public Scholarship in a Post-Affirmative Action Era

2 credits, C/NC

Summer Institute in the Arts & Humanities: A Summer Dive into Research

Nine weeks to complete an independent research project? Students in the Summer Institute for the Arts & Humanities embraced that challenge. This year's Summer Insitute was the subject of a recent feature story in the College of Arts & Science's Perspectives newsletter

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2014-15 Co-Sponsored Community Events

Each year the Simpson Center supports events in the greater Seattle community with small discretionary grants.Learn

2014-15 Co-Sponsored UW Events

Each year the Simpson Center co-sponsors dozens of interdepartmental speaker events and conferences with small discretionary grants. 

2015-2016 Society of Scholars

The Society of Scholars is an intellectual community of humanists of diverse generations, academic ranks, and departmental affiliations who contribute to and learn from one another's work. Meet the 2015-16 Scholars.

Access to Information as a Human Right

This conference with the UW Center for Human Rights examines access to information as a tool in securing truth, justice, and reparations for victims of crimes against humanity.

Affect & Audience in the Digital Age

This one-day symposium looks at artistic, archival, and activist projects that move from the digital to the analog, from embodied performance to notation.

African Media and Materialities

The African Media and Materialities research group focuses on media and materialities to bring together several strands of thought and research.

Certificate in Public Scholarship

The Certificate in Public Scholarship brings together a crossdisciplinary cohort of UW graduate students and faculty interested in public scholarship, campus-community partnerships, community-engaged research, digital and multimedia publication, and profession development for careers inside or outside of higher education.

Comics Studies

Comics have entered university curricula and multiple annual conferences, such as the International Comic Arts Forum, specialize in comics scholarship.

Digital Humanities

DH elevator button courtesy Quinn Dombrowski via Creative Commons/Flickr

Integrating computer technologies with humanities research. Using computational tools to retrieve, analyze, and visually represent data.

Digital Humanities Summer Fellowships

Digital Humanities Summer Fellowships support scholars pursuing research projects that use digital technologies in innovative and intensive ways and/or explore the historical, social, aesthetic, and cross-cultural implications of digital cultures. 

Disability Studies

Disability studies is a quickly growing field that approaches disability from a social-justice perspective.

Effable and Ineffable: Gabriel Fauré and the Limits of Criticism

Beloved by musicians yet inaccessible to scholars, Fauré's music provides a unique focal point for rethinking the relationship between music and discourse.

Ethnographic Aesthetics: Image, Sound, Word

Ethnographic Aesthetics is a speaker series featuring innovators whose work in poetry, sound, and film expands the practice of ethnography through humanistic, sensory forms of knowing.

Feminism and Classics

Caravaggio's painting of Medusa

Feminism and Classics is a conference exploring the multiple interconnections among the cultures of the ancient Mediterranean and the study of feminism, women, and gender.

Hebrew and the Humanities

The symposium Hebrew and the Humanities: Present Tense examines the experience of Americans who have traversed the cultural distance from English to Hebrew. Why do they do it? What is its value? How does the embattled position of Hebrew reflect the broader challenges of language arts and humanities education today?

Histories and Futures of Publication

Histories and Futures of Publication is an interdisciplinary lecture and colloquium series in manuscript, print, and digital cultures.

HUM Courses

The Simpson Center offers courses at the graduate level that reflect its commitments to crossdisciplinary research, digital humanities, and public scholarship.

 

International Piers Plowman Society Conference

Piers Plowman Luttrell Psalter

The International Piers Plowman Society meets to foster critical study of the poem(s) Piers Plowman, a fourteenth-century alliterative narrative told in a series of dream visions.

Intersectional Animal Studies: Thinking Humans and Animals Together

Following scholarship on intersectionality, a particularly powerful analytic tool for understanding identity formation and experience, we argue that species can be added to—and can intersect with—gender, race, class, ethnicity, and sexuality, to better understand how vectors of power and privilege are formed and how we might start to shift them in the direction of greater social justice.

Lake Union Laboratory

Lake Union Laboratory: Curating Collaborative Urban Research in the Digital Realm supports a cross-disciplinary team exploring the potential for digital platforms and tools to generate new transdisciplinary knowledges in and of ur

Mediating Difference: Sights and Sounds

Difference is a term that late twentieth and early twenty-first century scholars of race, gender, and sexuality have claimed and yet left largely un-theorized.

Medieval Studies

Canterbury Tales folio image

The Medieval Studies Graduate Interest Group fosters collaboration between disciplines on topics concerning the Middle Ages by bringing together medieval scholars from diverse departments on campus and the community.

Moving Images

The Moving Images graduate interest group brings together students from a variety of departments focused on the study of moving images, including narrative and documentary film as well as television and new media.

Palestine and the Public Sphere

This research cluster brings together faculty and graduate students for critical and cross-disciplinary conversations and activities concerning the cultural, political, and economic situation of Palestine and its framing in U.S.

Performance Studies Research Group

The Performance Studies Research Group draws together scholars from various disciplines to discuss foundational and new work in the field of performance studies.

Producing a Worthy Illness

Screen shot of crowdfunding site.

For Americans experiencing chronic and acute illnesses, fundraising through crowdsourcing websites has become a popular method to pay for the extraordinary costs of health care and medication. This project studies these new forms of self-representation from the perspectives of public health, medical anthropology, and media and communication studies.

Public Scholarship

The Simpson Center advances scholarship as a publicly engaged practice, a field often referred to as the public humanities. Public scholarship promotes mutually-beneficial partnerships between higher education and organizations in the public and private sectors and provides pathways for scholars to share their academic work with broader public audiences.

Reading and Writing Affect

Reading and Writing Affect is a monthly reading group and writing workshop that offers a thorough overview of the current field of affect theory and related discourses

Science, Technology & Society Studies

An interdisciplinary graduate certificate program in Science, Technology & Society Studies (STSS) welcomes its first cohort in the 2015-16 academic year, with 14 students from eight departments beginning the new program.

SeaTac-Seattle Minimum Wage Campaign History Project

The SeaTac-Seattle Minimum Wage Campaign History Project produces a digital web archive documenting the two successful historic struggles for a $15 minimum wage as well as continuing advocacy for better wages, sick pay, reduction

Seattle’s Freeway Revolt: A Living Legacy of Civic Activism

In the late 1960s and early 1970s, Seattle citizens joined together to oppose the construction and expansion of freeways that would have destroyed the heart of Seattle.

Socially Engaged Art in Japan

The symposium Socially Engaged Art in Japan explores work that crosses the boundaries between art and social activism and how Japan’s experience can inform a global understanding of such work.

Society of Scholars

The Society of Scholars is an intellectual community of humanists of diverse generations, academic ranks, and departmental affiliations who contribute to and learn from one another's work. The group meets biweekly throughout the year to discuss their current research. It is composed of faculty, graduate students, and postdoctoral fellows.

Space, Movement, and Translation

Space, Movement, and Translation brings together a diverse group of graduate students from different disciplines and backgrounds interested in novel ways of representing historical movement, space, and translation in scholarship.

Teaching with Technology

Teaching with Technology brings together graduate teaching assistants from various departments to discuss and develop technology-based teaching tools and lessons.

Troubling Translations

Cortes Marina

Our research cluster pursues the questioning of translation as a way of enlarging our understanding of the humanities and the social sciences.

Unmapping Global Studies

Unmapping Global Studies advances the critical study of Oceania and the global mobilities of Pacific Islanders and all native peoples.

Christof Mauch

How Vulnerable Is Our World? Environmental Sustainability and Lessons from the Past
Wednesday, December 2, 2015 - 7:00pm

Christof Mauch is a distinguished environmental historian and director of the Rachel Carson Center for Environment & Society in Munich, Germany, one of the world’s largest research centers for the environmental humanities and social sciences.