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Simpson Center Announces Barclay Simpson Prize for Scholarship in Public

The Walter Chapin Simpson Center mourns the passing of the visionary philanthropist Barclay Simpson on November 8, 2014. The generosity of Barclay Simpson is legendary among our faculty, students, and staff at the University of Washington and among leaders in the humanities across the country. His transformative gift in endowing the Simpson Center in the name of his father, Walter Chapin Simpson, was followed by contributions that expanded our view of the humanities. In honor of his memory, the Simpson Center announces the Barclay Simpson Prize for Scholarship in Public. The prize highlights one of Barclay Simpson’s key convictions and one of the center’s core missions: to foster scholarship in the humanities as a public good.

Research Spotlight: WIRED Returns to Stuart Hall

This year, WIRED’s research committee—a subgroup of WIRED members working to highlight research within the group—has organized a series of events around the life and work of Stuart Hall (1932-2014), a public intellectual whose contributions to interdisciplinary dialogue and social justice resonate with WIRED’s overall goals.

The Simpson Center Welcomes New Staff!

Meet the new members of the Simpson Center team: Nirmala Singh-Brinkman, Malia Trick, Alison Fiorenza, and Benji Liang!

Announcing Certificate in Public Scholarship Tri-Partnership + Video!

As of July 2014, the graduate Certificate in Public Scholarship is a three-way partnership between the School of Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences at the University of Washington Bothell, the UW Graduate School, and the Simpson Center. The development of this partnership represents an important step in the institutionalization of publicly-engaged scholarship at the University of Washington.

Call for Nominations: Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities

Beginning Oct. 15, the Simpson Center will accept nominations of UW faculty and visiting scholars for the Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities series for the 2015-16 academic year. The deadline is Nov. 14. 2014.

Fall Funding Round Application Deadline: Nov. 14, 2014

This year’s submission deadline for the Simpson Center’s Fall Funding Round is Nov. 14. Funding covers the term July 2015-June 2016.

Director’s Welcome

Welcome, all, to the new academic year!

UW Professor Thomas Lockwood Delivers Fall 2014 Katz Lecture

We hope you will join us on Tuesday, October 28, for the first Katz Distinguished Lecture in the Humanities of the 2014-15 year. Noted UW scholar Thomas Lockwood (English) will examine the work of Jonathan Swift. His lecture, titled “Is Eating Babies Really So Terrible? The Dark Genius of Jonathan Swift,” takes place at 7:00 pm in Kane 210.

Summer Institute in the Arts & Humanities: A Summer Dive into Research

Nine weeks to complete an independent research project? Students in the Summer Institute for the Arts & Humanities embraced that challenge. This year's Summer Insitute was the subject of a recent feature story in the College of Arts & Science's Perspectives newsletter

Announcing the 2014-15 HASTAC Scholars

The Simpson Center has nominated ten graduate students to serve as HASTAC Scholars for the 2014-15 academic year, based on their advancement of digital scholarship at the UW.

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provide UW faculty groups with leave to catalyze, deepen, or reconfigure cross-disciplinary research and to work toward publication.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

include speaker series, international research, and working conferences. They are selected for support based on their crossdisciplinary and interdisciplinary focus.

This series provides an opportunity for UW humanities scholars to discuss their recently published books.

seed new collaborations between faculty and graduate students who share research interests.

The Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities Series recognizes scholars in the humanities and emphasizes the role of the humanities in liberal education. The series is named after Solomon Katz, who served for 53 years at the UW, as an instructor, professor, Chair of the Department of History, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Provost, and Vice President for Academic Affairs. All Katz Lectures are free and open to the public.

You can now listen to full recordings of select Katz Lectures on our Podcasts page over in our redesigned Media + Publications section!

 

encourage crossdisciplinary collaboration among graduate students through organized readings, screenings, dissertation working groups, and other activities.

are awarded for faculty, postdoctoral, and graduate research through both internal and external grants.  

are supported by small discretionary grants that facilitate opportunities for interdepartmental lectures, colloquia, and conferences at UW.

fund extended crossdisciplinary, collaborative projects that are often aligned with Simpson Center initiatives.

include the tri-annual Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities and the Joff Hanuaer Lectures in Western Civilization.

at the Simpson Center includes interdisciplinary graduate courses and the Certificate in Public Scholarship.

supports projects that promote collaboration between scholars and community partners in education, governmental, non-profit, and grassroots organizations.

stand at the leading edge of change by promoting collaborative, crossdisciplinary research and transformational scholarship.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy.

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Check here for a listing of scholarly blogs related to Simpson Center initiatives, programs, and projects.

Reading groups and microseminars with a number of UW faculty whose research interests dwell outside the usual purview of Asian American Studies.

In 2007, the Joff Hanauer Endowment for Excellence in Western Civilization was established through a gift from Seattle businessman and philanthropist Jerry Hanauer, in memory of his son. It supports two professorships and several graduate student fellowships in Western Civilization, in addition to a lecture series.

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provide UW faculty groups with leave to catalyze, deepen, or reconfigure cross-disciplinary research and to work toward publication.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

include speaker series, international research, and working conferences. They are selected for support based on their crossdisciplinary and interdisciplinary focus.

This series provides an opportunity for UW humanities scholars to discuss their recently published books.

seed new collaborations between faculty and graduate students who share research interests.

The Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities Series recognizes scholars in the humanities and emphasizes the role of the humanities in liberal education. The series is named after Solomon Katz, who served for 53 years at the UW, as an instructor, professor, Chair of the Department of History, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Provost, and Vice President for Academic Affairs. All Katz Lectures are free and open to the public.

You can now listen to full recordings of select Katz Lectures on our Podcasts page over in our redesigned Media + Publications section!

 

encourage crossdisciplinary collaboration among graduate students through organized readings, screenings, dissertation working groups, and other activities.

are awarded for faculty, postdoctoral, and graduate research through both internal and external grants.  

are supported by small discretionary grants that facilitate opportunities for interdepartmental lectures, colloquia, and conferences at UW.

fund extended crossdisciplinary, collaborative projects that are often aligned with Simpson Center initiatives.

include the tri-annual Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities and the Joff Hanuaer Lectures in Western Civilization.

at the Simpson Center includes interdisciplinary graduate courses and the Certificate in Public Scholarship.

supports projects that promote collaboration between scholars and community partners in education, governmental, non-profit, and grassroots organizations.

stand at the leading edge of change by promoting collaborative, crossdisciplinary research and transformational scholarship.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy.

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Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy.

Check here for a listing of scholarly blogs related to Simpson Center initiatives, programs, and projects.

Reading groups and microseminars with a number of UW faculty whose research interests dwell outside the usual purview of Asian American Studies.

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war

law

In 2007, the Joff Hanauer Endowment for Excellence in Western Civilization was established through a gift from Seattle businessman and philanthropist Jerry Hanauer, in memory of his son. It supports two professorships and several graduate student fellowships in Western Civilization, in addition to a lecture series.

SeaTac-Seattle Minimum Wage Campaign History Project

The SeaTac-Seattle Minimum Wage Campaign History Project produces a digital web archive documenting the two successful historic struggles for a $15 minimum wage as well as continuing advocacy for better wages, sick pay, reduction

Palestine and the Public Sphere

This research cluster brings together faculty and graduate students for critical and cross-disciplinary conversations and activities concerning the cultural, political, and economic situation of Palestine and its framing in U.S.

Comics Studies

Comics have entered university curricula and multiple annual conferences, such as the International Comic Arts Forum, specialize in comics scholarship.

Moving Images

The Moving Images graduate interest group brings together students from a variety of departments focused on the study of moving images, including narrative and documentary film as well as television and new media.

African Media and Materialities

The African Media and Materialities research group focuses on media and materialities to bring together several strands of thought and research.

Teaching with Technology

Teaching with Technology brings together graduate teaching assistants from various departments to discuss and develop technology-based teaching tools and lessons.

Space, Movement, and Translation

Space, Movement, and Translation brings together a diverse group of graduate students from different disciplines and backgrounds interested in novel ways of representing historical movement, space, and translation in scholarship.

Socially Engaged Art in Japan

The symposium Socially Engaged Art in Japan explores work that crosses the boundaries between art and social activism and how Japan’s experience can inform a global understanding of such work.

Rachel Arteaga

ArteagaRachel Arteaga holds an MA in English from Boston College and is completing her doctorate in English at the University of Washington, where she has taught courses in composition and American literature. Her dissertation, which she expects to defend in December 2015, focuses on feelings of faith—among them, hope, doubt, and joy—in American literature.

2014-15 Co-Sponsored Community Events

Each year the Simpson Center supports events in the greater Seattle community with small discretionary grants.Learn

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