News tagged with 'any keyword'

UW Graduate Students Ask Seattle, Tacoma to “Queer the Art Museum”

Photographic still of David Wojnarowicz from <i>Silence=Death</I>, 1990.

How can museums better address, engage, and integrate queer culture? UW graduate students Erin Bailey (Museology) and Nicole Robert (Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies) are organizing “Queering the Art Museum,” a symposium that they hope will invite attendees to explore such questions.

To the Middle Ages: Graduate Students Invite UW Community to Explore the Medieval Era

The tale of Beowulf survives in a single manuscript dating to between the 8th and 11th centuries. This epic poem tells of the heroic Beowulf, who comes to the aid of King Hrothgar of the Danes, slays Grendel (the monster who has been plaguing Hrothgar’s hall), battles Grendel’s mother, and returns home to Sweden, to become king of his people. Later in life, Beowulf is called to battle with a dragon. He triumphs—but is fatally wounded in the fight.

Though centuries have passed since the story of Beowulf was first written, it continues to live on, thanks to scholars such as those involved in the Medieval Studies graduate interest group.

Doctoral Student Ryan Burns Selected to Present on Digital Scholarship at UW HuskyFest 2012

Ryan Burns

Ryan Burns, doctoral student in Geography and Simpson Center Public Scholarship Fellow, has been invited to share his research at HuskyFest 2012, as part of the College of Arts & Sciences Dean’s Showcase. The UW is hosting HuskyFest—a three-day campus-wide festival showcasing the university’s dynamic scholarship and activities—to celebrate its 150th anniversary. HuskyFest, which takes place April 19-21, will feature a variety of activities, including live music, food, dance, lectures, demonstrations, interactive booths, open houses, art exhibits, tours, giveaways and much more.

Katz Lecturers for 2012-2013 Academic Year Announced

Victoria Lawson, Cathy Davidson, and Josiah Ober have been named Katz Distinguished Lecturers in the Humanities for the 2012-2013 academic year. One of the most distinguished awards in the humanities at UW, the Katz lectureship recognizes scholars and emphasizes the role of the humanities in liberal education. Each year, one UW faculty member and two scholars from outside institutions are awarded the title.

Winter 2012 Visiting Scholars and Speakers

Dylan Rodríguez lectures at the UW during Winter 2012.

Dylan Rodríguez gave a compelling lecture at the UW during Winter 2012. And he was not the only one; the Simpson Center and the University of Washington had the honor of hosting a number of brilliant scholars over Winter Quarter.

 

 

 

A Tale of Conversational Canines: "The Day the Dogs Talked" - UW Today

The Day the Dogs Talked, the latest book by UW professor emeritus of comparative literature Hazard Adams, is the subject of a recent UW Today feature by writer Peter Kelley. Adams gave a "New Books in Print" talk on this at the Simpson Center in February.

Janelle Taylor Represents the UW at Humanities Advocacy Day, Washington, DC

UW Professor of Anthropology Janelle Taylor

Janelle Taylor (Anthropology) will represent the Simpson Center and the UW at Humanities Advocacy Day in Washington, DC, on March 20, 2012. Humanities Advocacy Day was established in 2000 by the National Humanities Alliance (NHA)—an advocacy coalition dedicated to the advancement of humanities education, research, preservation, and public programs—to increase public support for the humanities.

Making Scenes, Building Communities: “Women Who Rock” (Un)Conference, Film Festival, and Courses

Michelle Habell-Pallan (right) with Women Who Rock participants.

The Women Who Rock (Un)Conference and Film Festival return for their second annual meeting March 2-3, 2012. Focus on “Making Scenes and Building Communities,” Women Who Rock will feature keynote speakers Alice “Bag” Armendariz, author of Violence Girl: From East L.A. Rage to Hollywood Stage, A Chicana Punk Story, and Medusa, also known as the “Godmother of West Coast Hip-Hop.”

Graduate Interest Group Spotlight: Keywords for Video Games Studies

Organizers Ed Chang and Theresa Horstman at a recent Keywords workshop.

Avatar. Gamer. Power. Control. Time. Altplay. Fandom. Hack. Customization. These gaming terms may be part of everyday language to those who play video games, but for the members of Keywords for Video Games Studies, a graduate student interest group funded by the Simpson Center, they are much more. When acknowledged as keywords, they become sites of critical engagement and scholarly dialogue.

Type Designer Jean François Porchez in Residence at the UW

Jean François Porchez

Widely recognized as a typographic icon in his native France, type designer Jean François Porchez visits the UW this week to work with UW students and faculty. He will also be delivering two free public lectures and visiting professional design firms in the Seattle area.

Pages

provide UW faculty groups with leave to catalyze, deepen, or reconfigure cross-disciplinary research and to work toward publication.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

include speaker series, international research, and working conferences. They are selected for support based on their crossdisciplinary and interdisciplinary focus.

This series provides an opportunity for UW humanities scholars to discuss their recently published books.

seed new collaborations between faculty and graduate students who share research interests.

The Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities Series recognizes scholars in the humanities and emphasizes the role of the humanities in liberal education. The series is named after Solomon Katz, who served for 53 years at the UW, as an instructor, professor, Chair of the Department of History, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Provost, and Vice President for Academic Affairs. All Katz Lectures are free and open to the public.

You can now listen to full recordings of select Katz Lectures on our Podcasts page over in our redesigned Media + Publications section!

 

encourage crossdisciplinary collaboration among graduate students through organized readings, screenings, dissertation working groups, and other activities.

are awarded for faculty, postdoctoral, and graduate research through both internal and external grants.  

are supported by small discretionary grants that facilitate opportunities for interdepartmental lectures, colloquia, and conferences at UW.

fund extended crossdisciplinary, collaborative projects that are often aligned with Simpson Center initiatives.

include the tri-annual Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities and the Joff Hanuaer Lectures in Western Civilization.

at the Simpson Center includes interdisciplinary graduate courses and the Certificate in Public Scholarship.

supports projects that promote collaboration between scholars and community partners in education, governmental, non-profit, and grassroots organizations.

stand at the leading edge of change by promoting collaborative, crossdisciplinary research and transformational scholarship.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy.

Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy.

Check here for a listing of scholarly blogs related to Simpson Center initiatives, programs, and projects.

Reading groups and microseminars with a number of UW faculty whose research interests dwell outside the usual purview of Asian American Studies.

In 2007, the Joff Hanauer Endowment for Excellence in Western Civilization was established through a gift from Seattle businessman and philanthropist Jerry Hanauer, in memory of his son. It supports two professorships and several graduate student fellowships in Western Civilization, in addition to a lecture series.

GIG

provide UW faculty groups with leave to catalyze, deepen, or reconfigure cross-disciplinary research and to work toward publication.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

include speaker series, international research, and working conferences. They are selected for support based on their crossdisciplinary and interdisciplinary focus.

This series provides an opportunity for UW humanities scholars to discuss their recently published books.

seed new collaborations between faculty and graduate students who share research interests.

The Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities Series recognizes scholars in the humanities and emphasizes the role of the humanities in liberal education. The series is named after Solomon Katz, who served for 53 years at the UW, as an instructor, professor, Chair of the Department of History, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Provost, and Vice President for Academic Affairs. All Katz Lectures are free and open to the public.

You can now listen to full recordings of select Katz Lectures on our Podcasts page over in our redesigned Media + Publications section!

 

encourage crossdisciplinary collaboration among graduate students through organized readings, screenings, dissertation working groups, and other activities.

are awarded for faculty, postdoctoral, and graduate research through both internal and external grants.  

are supported by small discretionary grants that facilitate opportunities for interdepartmental lectures, colloquia, and conferences at UW.

fund extended crossdisciplinary, collaborative projects that are often aligned with Simpson Center initiatives.

include the tri-annual Katz Distinguished Lectures in the Humanities and the Joff Hanuaer Lectures in Western Civilization.

at the Simpson Center includes interdisciplinary graduate courses and the Certificate in Public Scholarship.

supports projects that promote collaboration between scholars and community partners in education, governmental, non-profit, and grassroots organizations.

stand at the leading edge of change by promoting collaborative, crossdisciplinary research and transformational scholarship.

Class aptent taciti sociosqu ad litora torquent per conubia nostra, per inceptos himenaeos. Donec purus massa, condimentum non elementum in, consectetur vitae magna. Integer pellentesque tempus libero, eu malesuada elit dignissim sollicitudin.

Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy.

art

Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy.

Check here for a listing of scholarly blogs related to Simpson Center initiatives, programs, and projects.

Reading groups and microseminars with a number of UW faculty whose research interests dwell outside the usual purview of Asian American Studies.

NEH

war

law

In 2007, the Joff Hanauer Endowment for Excellence in Western Civilization was established through a gift from Seattle businessman and philanthropist Jerry Hanauer, in memory of his son. It supports two professorships and several graduate student fellowships in Western Civilization, in addition to a lecture series.

Anne Balsamo

Anne Balsamo
Designing Culture: The Technological Imagination at Work in the Creation of Cultural Heritage
Wednesday, March 4, 2015 - 7:00pm
Kane Hall, Room 210

Anne Balsamo (Media Studies, The New School) is a scholar and media-maker whose work explores the connections between culture, art

Simpson Center Announces Spring 2014 Grant Recipients

The Simpson Center’s Executive Board has awarded support to UW scholars for 2014-15 year. Simpson Center funding sponsors a wide range of activities, including cross-departmental research clusters, graduate student interest groups, and scholarly conferences. The following is a list of projects and their lead organizers who will receive funding, based on this Spring’s grant round:

Reflecting on My Time as a Simpson Center Student Assistant

This spring the Simpson Center says good-bye to four graduating UW students who have been working with us over the last few years. Our web tech & communications assistant Dana Bublitz will receive her Master’s in Library Science from the Information School, our event photographer Max Cleary will graduate with a Bachelor’s in Photomedia from the School of Art, and our office assistants Lydia Harrington and Ellie Stillwell will receive a Master’s in Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations and a Bachelor’s in Psychology from the College of Arts & Sciences, respectively. One of our student assistants, Ellie Stillwell, wrote the following reflection on her time at the Simpson Center. We were incredibly moved by it and would like to share it here:

 

Call for Papers: Serialization in Asia

Submission/Application Deadline: 
Tue, 07/01/2014 (All day)

The Center for Korean Studies at the University of Washington invites paper proposals for “Serialization in Asia,” a conference on serialized cultural production to be held at the University of Washington, May 15-16, 2015.

Thomas Lockwood

Lockwood
Is Eating Babies Really So Terrible? The Dark Genius of Jonathan Swift
Tuesday, October 28, 2014 - 7:00pm
Kane Hall, Room 210

National Endowment for the Humanities: 2015 Summer Stipends

Submission/Application Deadline: 
Fri, 08/08/2014 (All day)

The National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Stipends competition supports two- and four-year college and university teachers and other humanists in their research and teaching by providing a stipend for two consecutive months of full-time study or research during the summer. The maximum stipend is $6,000. The University of Washington, Seattle campus, is permitted to nominate two members of its full-time faculty. (Tacoma and Bothell campuses have independent processes.)

Marvell’s Latin and Wordsworth’s Greek

Excerpt from Stephen Hinds' 2/25/14 Katz Lecture, "Marvell’s Latin and Wordsworth’s Greek: Literature and Literalism in the Classical Tradition."

Call for Proposals: Harlan Hahn Awards for Disability Studies

Submission/Application Deadline: 
Mon, 05/19/2014 - 23:00

The Disability Studies Program is pleased to announce that there will be funds from the Harlan Hahn endowment available to the University of Washington community. Students, faculty, and staff from all three UW campuses are invited to submit a proposal for one of the two types of awards ($500–5000):

      I) Student Scholarship for UW undergraduate and graduate students

      II) Research Award for UW faculty and staff

Pages