News tagged with 'digital humanities'

Creating Value and Impact in the Digital Age Through Translational Humanities: A Case Statement by Abby Smith Rumsey

The Simpson Center is delighted to circulate the following case statement, written by Abby Smith Rumsey, director of the Scholarly Communication Institute (SCI). In it, she explores the value of the humanities in the digital era by emphasizing the importance of translational work in which humanities scholars engage with more diverse publics. Reaching out to publics beyond academic borders is one of the key missions of the Simpson Center.

Demystifying the Digital Humanities at UW

The emerging field of digital humanities (DH) has been attracting more and more attention on campus in recent years. But what exactly are the “digital humanities”? And how exactly does one going about becoming a “digital humanist”? To answer some of these questions, English graduate students Paige Morgan and Sarah Kremen-Hicks have created a year-long workshop series, “Demystifying the Digital Humanities.”

Rock the Archive: Women Who Rock’s 2013 (un)Conference & Film Festival Launches Digital Oral History Archive

The guiding impulse of the humanities involves the creation and interpretation of archives. Historically “the archive” connotes repositories of officially-sanctioned value—Shakespeare’s folios, the Eisenhower papers, government-sponsored entities such as the National Archives & Records Administration. The Women Who Rock research project, now in its third year of funding by the Simpson Center, wants to rock that idea, revising popular and academic accounts by producing alternative, community-driven archives in a D.I.Y. (“do-it-yourself”) spirit.

Simpson Center Meets Digital Humanities Fundraising Goal!

The Simpson Center has met its goal of matching the National Endowment for the Humanities Challenge Grant in support of the digital humanities! Thanks to our donors, we have raised $1.875 million since fundraising began in 2009!

Cathy N. Davidson Delivers Winter 2013 Katz Lecture on Future of Higher Education, Digital Learning

In one generation, we have undergone tremendous changes in how we communicate, socialize, learn, do business, and engage in civic life. We rely on non-experts for information on sites such as Wikipedia and take the advice of strangers on everything from restaurant recommendations to health care. Interactive digital technologies have changed how we learn in everyday life far faster than they’ve changed the structures, motives, and metrics of our educational systems. Until now. According to Winter 2013 Katz Lecturer Cathy N. Davidson, we are on the threshold of a monumental transformation in higher education, one aimed at the needs and expectations of the next generation of resilient, connected, self-paced, peer-inspired, creative, multidisciplinary, and multicultural global learners.

A Sneak Peek at the Simpson Center’s Collaboration Space!

Construction is currently under way to transform three small offices into a 375 square-foot flexible, multidisciplinary collaboration space at the Simpson Center! The new space will be a hybrid: part digital scholarship lab and part space for scholarly discussion. Flexibility is the key concept behind this space. By selecting furniture and equipment that is easily stored, stacked, folded, and moved, this space will be a dynamic meeting space for a variety of small engagements and activities.

The Unconference Experience: InfoCamp and THATCamp

Unconferences are quickly becoming an alternative to traditional academic conferences. The model is especially appealing because it actively promotes collaboration and discussion acrossdisciplines, and participants are engaged at every level. This fall, Dana Bublitz, a graduate staff assistant at the Simpson Center, had the opportunity to attend two unconferences: InfoCamp (Information Camp), held here at the UW, and THATCamp (The Humanities and Technology Camp): Digital Humanities and Libraries in Denver, Colorado.

"Thank You" from the Simpson Center!

We are very excited to announce that, counting funds and pledges raised thus far, we are just $25,000 away from our goal of matching the NEH Challenge Grant in support of the Digital Humanities Commons! Thanks to all who have donated to this initiative, helping us move even closer toward our goal of $1,875,000!

Laying the Groundwork for the Digital Humanities Commons

Anticipated to begin in 2014, the Digital Humanities Commons—a summer fellowship program for faculty and graduate students at the UW—will support innovative and experimental research both inspired by new technologies and about these new methods of research and forms of communication. Where research in the humanities is often undertaken by a single scholar, the Commons will enable faculty and graduate students to collaborate with librarians, technologies, and designers to animate their scholarship with new visualization tools, digital media, and communications platforms.

Technology, Scholarship, and the Humanities: A Conversation with Jentery Sayers

Jentery Sayers

Integrating computer technologies with humanities research. Utilizing computational tools to retrieve, analyze, and visually represent data. Exploring multimodal ways of teaching, disseminating, and publishing scholarship. Curating online collections. The field of digital humanities is all of this, and more.

 

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Teaching with Technology

Teaching with Technology aims to bring together graduate teaching assistants from various departments to discuss and develop technology-based teaching tools and lessons. This group provides a platform for instructors with varying experience levels to collaborate on and workshop a pedagogical toolkit that brings technology such as mobile devices, screen-capture software, social media, and blogging into a variety of classroom settings.

Lake Union Laboratory: Curating Collaborative Urban Research in the Digital Realm

This collaboration studio grant supports a cross-disciplinary team exploring the potential for digital platforms and tools to generate new transdisciplinary knowledges in and of urbanism and cities.

Histories and Futures of Reading

Histories and Futures of Reading is an interdisciplinary lecture and colloquium series in manuscript, print, and digital cultures organized in conjunction with the Textual Studies Program's three-year plan for curricular revision

Affect & Audience in the Digital Age

Affect & Audience in the Digital Age explores emergent modes of creative public scholarship.

Society for Textual Scholarship 2014 Conference: Textual Scholarship Across the Disciplines

The 18th annual international conference of the Society for Textual Scholarship will be held March 20-22, 2014, at the University of Washington. The conference welcomes scholars whose work on the materiality of books and media intersects with big-picture debates about the place of the humanities, innovation in graduate education, and public scholarship. 

Teaching with Technology: Graduate Interest Group Invites Student Instructors to Share Technology-Based Pedagogical Practices

How are UW graduate teaching assistants across the humanities and social sciences using technology in their classrooms? This year, English graduate students Rachel Arteaga and A.J. Burgin have organized Teaching with Technology, a Graduate Interest Group (GIG) at the Simpson Center, so that graduate instructors can share ideas with one another. The group provides a platform for both experienced and less-experienced teachers to discuss digital tools (for example, the use of mobile devices, social media, and blogging) in various classroom settings.

Digital Humanities Resources: On-Campus and Online

Curious to learn more about digital humanities scholarship? This list of digital humanities resources, created by the Simpson Center’s web tech Dana Bublitz, may be useful to anyone currently involved in or considering getting started with digital humanities scholarship at the UW. It includes information about both on-campus and online resources.

Histories and Futures of the Book: Exploring Reading and Writing in the Digital Age

Histories and Futures of the Book is a 2013-14 interdisciplinary lecture series in manuscript, print, and digital culture taking place in conjunction with the annual meeting of the Society for Textual Scholarship (STS), March 20-22, 2014, at the UW. Organized by Jeffrey Knight (English) and Geoffrey Turnovsky (French & Italian), the lecture series and conference welcomes distinguished scholars from across the country whose work on the materiality of books and media intersects with big-picture debates about the place of the humanities, innovation in graduate education, and public scholarship.

Women Who Rock

Since 2011, Women Who Rock (WWR) has brought together scholars/archivists, musicians, media-makers, performers, artists, and activists to explore the role of women and popular music in the creation of cultural scenes and social justice movements in the Americas and beyond. The project encompasses several interwoven components: project-based coursework at the graduate and undergraduate levels; an annual participant-driven conference and film festival; and an oral history archive hosted by the University of Washington Libraries Digital Initiatives Program that ties the various components together. The archive features oral histories with Medusa, Alice Bag, Nobuko Miyamoto, and many others.

New Summer Digital Humanities Commons Research Fellowships at the Simpson Center

The Simpson Center’s Summer Digital Humanities Commons Fellowships support scholars pursuing research projects that use digital technologies in innovative and intensive ways and/or explore the historical, social, aesthetic, and cross-cultural implications of digital cultures. Applications will be accepted starting Oct. 15 for the Summer 2014 fellowship term. The deadline is Nov. 15.

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