News tagged with 'digital humanities'

How the Age of Amazon Is Reshaping Literary History

Amazon's dominance of the book-publishing industry and relentless focus on customer service may herald a new era in American fiction.

We Wandered as a Cloud: Collaborative Poetry for a Digital Age

The research cluster Affect & Audience in the Digital Age brings a distinctly collaborative approach for rethinking poetry in the digital era.

Announcing the 2014-15 HASTAC Scholars

The Simpson Center has nominated ten graduate students to serve as HASTAC Scholars for the 2014-15 academic year, based on their advancement of digital scholarship at the UW.

Society for Textual Scholarship 2014 Conference: Textual Scholarship Across the Disciplines

The 18th annual international conference of the Society for Textual Scholarship will be held March 20-22, 2014, at the University of Washington. The conference welcomes scholars whose work on the materiality of books and media intersects with big-picture debates about the place of the humanities, innovation in graduate education, and public scholarship. 

Teaching with Technology: Graduate Interest Group Invites Student Instructors to Share Technology-Based Pedagogical Practices

How are UW graduate teaching assistants across the humanities and social sciences using technology in their classrooms? This year, English graduate students Rachel Arteaga and A.J. Burgin have organized Teaching with Technology, a Graduate Interest Group (GIG) at the Simpson Center, so that graduate instructors can share ideas with one another. The group provides a platform for both experienced and less-experienced teachers to discuss digital tools (for example, the use of mobile devices, social media, and blogging) in various classroom settings.

Digital Humanities Resources: On-Campus and Online

Curious to learn more about digital humanities scholarship? This list of digital humanities resources, created by the Simpson Center’s web tech Dana Bublitz, may be useful to anyone currently involved in or considering getting started with digital humanities scholarship at the UW. It includes information about both on-campus and online resources.

Histories and Futures of the Book: Exploring Reading and Writing in the Digital Age

Histories and Futures of the Book is a 2013-14 interdisciplinary lecture series in manuscript, print, and digital culture taking place in conjunction with the annual meeting of the Society for Textual Scholarship (STS), March 20-22, 2014, at the UW. Organized by Jeffrey Knight (English) and Geoffrey Turnovsky (French & Italian), the lecture series and conference welcomes distinguished scholars from across the country whose work on the materiality of books and media intersects with big-picture debates about the place of the humanities, innovation in graduate education, and public scholarship.

New Summer Digital Humanities Commons Research Fellowships at the Simpson Center

The Simpson Center’s Summer Digital Humanities Commons Fellowships support scholars pursuing research projects that use digital technologies in innovative and intensive ways and/or explore the historical, social, aesthetic, and cross-cultural implications of digital cultures. Applications will be accepted starting Oct. 15 for the Summer 2014 fellowship term. The deadline is Nov. 15.

Announcing the UW's 2013-14 HASTAC Scholars

The Simpson Center has nominated ten graduate students to serve as HASTAC Scholars for the 2013-14 academic year, based on their advancement of digital scholarship at the UW.

Affect & Audience in the Digital Age

Affect & Audience in the Digital Age is a symposium and performance event exploring the aesthetics of digital meditation in contemporary poetry. While poets have long been expected to connect with readers through carefully constructed emotional appeals, much poetic work is now written through impersonal digital methodologies such as crowd sourcing and data mining. Yet digitally mediated poetry can still have a particular affective density: even appropriated text from the Internet can convey the “powerful feelings” that Wordsworth described as the ideal for poetry.

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